Nyack College

Manhattan Campus

 

School of Music

Student Handbook

 

Gallery Photo: An evening of joyous praise

 

Sing joyfully to the LORD, you righteous;

it is fitting for the upright to praise him.

Praise the LORD with the harp;

make music to him on the ten-stringed lyre.

Sing to him a new song; play skillfully, and shout for joy.

Psalm 33: 1-3

 

 

 

 

 

2011-2012

 

 

Gallery Photo: Members of the NYC Campus Chorale

 

 

 

 

 

The contents of this handbook, along with the Nyack College Catalog,

are to be studied and referred to concerning the music program.

 

 

Students are responsible for the contents of this document

and will be expected to meet the various curricular requirements.

 

 The School of Music Student Handbook may also be found on the Nyack College website.

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

DEDICATION……………………………………………………………………………………        4

 

PREFACE………………………………………………………………………………………..         4

 

NYACK COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT & PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION…….        4

 

CORE VALUES & UNDERGRADUATE LEARNING GOALS……………………………        5

 

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES……………………………………………………………………        6

 

VISION STATEMENT (NYC)………………………………………………………………….        7

 

FACULTY & STAFF…………………………………………………………………………….        8

 

MUSIC PROGRAM……………………………………………………………………………...        9-15

Admissions to the Program……………………………………………………………….        9

Advanced Placement………………………………………………………………………       9

Applied Music Requirements for Music Majors…………………………………………       9

Studio Class………………………………………………………………………         10

            Private Lessons…………………………………………………………………           10

            Weekly Lesson Guideline…………………………………………………………        10

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s)……………………………………………………        10

Functional Piano and Piano Proficiency…………………………………………………..      11

Jury Exams…………………………………………………………………………………      12

Student Advisement………………………………………………………………………        12

 

DEGREE OFFERINGS, DEGREE REQUIREMENTS & RECOMMENED REPERTORY     15-31

Associate of Science in Music……………………………………………………………        15

Bachelor of Arts in Music…………………………………………………………………       15

            Liberal Arts Music Major – BA……………………………………………………      15

            Major in Voice……………………………………………………………………        15

Bachelor of Music in Composition……………………………………………………….       16

Bachelor of Music in Music Education ……………………………………………………     17

            Major in Piano……………………………………………………………………        17

            Major in Voice……………………………………………………………………        18

Bachelor of Music in Performance: Instrumental…………………………………………     19

            Major in Clarinet………………………………………………………………..          19

Major in Flute……………………………………………………………………         19

Major in Classical Guitar………………………………………………………          20

Major in Horn……………………………………………………………………        21

Major in Baroque Recorder……………………………………………..……….       21

Major in Saxophone………………………………………………………………       22

Major in Trombone………………………………………………………………        23

Major in Trumpet………………………………………………………………..         23

Major in Tuba…………………………………………………………………….        23

Major in Violin……………………………………………………………………       24

Bachelor of Music in Performance: Piano or Organ……………………………………….    24

            Major in Piano……………………………………………………………………        24

            Major in Organ……………………………………………………………………       26

 

Bachelor of Music in Performance: Voice…………………………………………………    26

Bachelor of Sacred Music …………………………………………………………………      30

            Major in Piano…………………………………………………………………..          30

            Major in Voice…………………………………………………………………...         31

Bachelor of Science in Music and Worship………………………………………………      31

 

PERFORMANCE OPPORTUNITIES…………………………………………………………        32-32

Touring Opportunities…………………………………………………………………….        32

Music Ensembles………………………………………………………………………….        32

Mandatory Concert Attendance………………………………………………………….        32

 

STUDENT RECITALS………………………………………………………………………….         32-43

Recital Preparation…………………………………………………………………………      32

Stage Etiquette/Performance Suggestions……………………………………………….         33

Junior and Senior Recitals…………………………………………………………………      33

Junior/Senior Recital Confirmation Form…………………………………………………      35

Sample Programs for Junior & Senior Recitals……………………………………………     39

Senior Recital for Music Education, or Shared Junior Recital…………………..     39

Senior Recital…………………………………………………………………….        41

 

SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS AND GRANTS………………………………………………….      44

 

MISCELLANEOUS MATERIALS & RESOURCES………………………………………….       44-51

Myths and Facts about Nyack College……………………………………………………       44

Library Resources…………………………………………………………………………       47

Internet Resources: ………………………………………………………………………         48

Sheet Music & Free Sheet Music…………………………………………………      48

Nyack College School of Music Websites…………………………………………     48

Performance Venues………………………………………………………………      49

Sites for the Study of Music……………………………………………………….      50

Copyright Laws……………………………………………………………………….……      51

             Nyack College Catalog and Other Forms……………………………………….……..      51-52

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DEDICATION

    We dedicate our newest handbook to the memory of Music Professor George Merritt: actor, singer, and mentor to everyone he met, and to the memory of Prof. Margaret (Peg) Bowen, director of our ESL program, missionary, and one who constantly encouraged our School of Music.

 

 

PREFACE

    The School of Music Student Handbook is written as a guide for students majoring in the study of music at Nyack College.  Each year the school makes continued efforts to enhance the program of study.  The School of Music Student Handbook is updated each summer, and copies are made available to all music majors at the beginning of the fall semester.  The contents of this handbook, along with the Nyack College Catalog, are to be studied and referred to concerning questions relating to the music program. Students are responsible for the contents of this document and will be expected to meet the various curricular requirements.

 

NYACK COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT & PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION

    Nyack College, a Christian liberal arts college of The Christian and Missionary Alliance, seeks to assist students in their spiritual, intellectual, and social formation, preparing them for lives of service to Christ and His church and to society in a way that reflects the Kingdom of God and its ethnic diversity.

 

“Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is just, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy— think about such things.”

– Philippians 4:8

 

In keeping with this wisdom, Nyack College is committed to providing its students a broad education based upon the liberal arts and rooted in the historic Christian faith. Thus Nyack College is a Christian liberal arts college dedicated to pursuing, integrating, communicating, and applying truth. 

CORE VALUES & UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT LEARNING GOALS

    Nyack College and Alliance Theological Seminary seek to exalt Jesus Christ and fulfill their mission by being:

 

Socially Relevant

Ø  Preparing students to serve in ministerial, educational, healing, and community-building professions. Students will recognize the value of economic, political, social, and organizational systems as tools for positive change.

Ø  Students will apply a foundation of compassion and integrity to their chosen field of study.  Students will demonstrate servant leadership as they engage the community and marketplace.

 

Academically Excellent –

Ø  Pursuing academic excellence in the spirit of grace and humility.

Ø  Students will attain an educational foundation in arts and humanities, science, mathematics,

      and social science.

Ø  Students will be able to communicate in oral and written form and demonstrate information 

      and technological literacy.

Ø  Students will demonstrate critical thinking, problem solving, and research skills across the

      curriculum.

 

Globally Engaged –

Ø  Fostering a global perspective within a multi-ethnic and multicultural Christian academic community.

Ø  Students will understand the interplay of historical, cultural, and geographical realities of the global community.

Ø  Students will value diversity through an understanding of worldviews, languages, cultures, and peoples.

Ø  Students will engage in service opportunities within the global community.

 

Intentionally Diverse –

Ø  Providing educational access and support to motivated students from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds.

Ø  Students will understand the heritages and traditions of diverse peoples and cultures.

Ø  Students will appreciate the need to promote biblical principles of social equality.

Ø  Students will engage in interactions and relationships with those from diverse backgrounds.

 

Emphasizing Personal Transformation –

Ø  Emphasizing the integration of faith, learning, and spiritual transformation.

Ø  Students will grow in their faith as they pursue God’s purpose in their lives.

Ø  Students will integrate their Christian worldview into learning and service.

Ø  Students will apply discipleship principles to assist in the personal transformation of others.

 

 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC GOALS & OBJECTIVES

GOAL 1.                  To graduate students who have acquired and developed the foundational academic skills of reading carefully and critically, communicating clearly and cogently, and thinking analytically and synthetically

o   By designing into music courses a cognitive approach to the language and syntax of harmony, form, and the structure of music.

o   By designing into the music history sequence a comprehensive overview of Western music and related religious, philosophical, political, scientific, and social developments.

o   By designing into music literature courses the appreciation and understanding of non-Western music and music of the church, including research components and the analysis of contemporary phenomena in these areas.

o   By fostering the aural development, kinesthetic processes, and aesthetic sensitivities which form the basis of professional caliber musicianship.

 

GOAL 2.                  To graduate students who have achieved a broad understanding of human learning.

o   By fostering in our students the skills and motivation for life-long learning and participation in music.

o   By encouraging all students to value the creativity of the human spirit and the aesthetic dimension of life.

o   By promoting involvement in campus life through participation in aesthetic and cultural activities.

 

GOAL 3.                  To graduate students who have achieved an in-depth understanding of one particular field of study by meeting the requirements of at least one major.

o   By training our students to acquire the theoretical and practical skills required by music educators, church musicians, performers and composers.

o   By fostering a broad knowledge of music literature, both sacred and secular, through study and performance.

o   By employing a competency-based approach for course design and requirements throughout the program while encouraging artistic creativity.

o   By cultivating career programs and awareness in the various music and music-related fields.

o   By utilizing the cultural resources of various metropolitan New York area institutions.

 

GOAL 4.                  To graduate students who have achieved a basic Christian worldview understanding that can serve as a basis for interpreting experience.

o   By providing experiences in Christian ministry involving music in the Christian and Missionary Alliance and other churches.

o   By promoting a sense of Christian love and caring throughout the endeavors of the School of Music.

o   By building the self-esteem of the individual through musical achievement in the Christian context.

o   By fostering a respect for diverse forms of music, worship, and culture.

 

GOAL 5.                  To strengthen a sense of civic responsibility to the community

o   By promoting in our students an appreciation for the opportunities and responsibilities, which exist in a democratic society concerning the arts.

o   By encouraging involvement in civic affairs through music and the allied arts. 

 

VISION STATEMENT, NCNYC

    Every school within Nyack College has its own mission statement. We on the Manhattan campus share a mission statement with the Rockland campus, which you have just read. With our sister campus we also share regulations governing the School of Music. These regulations are based upon the practice of colleges accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music and by other accrediting agencies. Such regulations are stated within this Handbook and must be followed, with few adaptations, by all Nyack campuses.

    Nevertheless, located as we are within the City of Manhattan, attended by many commuters and others who desire to experience the urban environment unique to this world center of culture, the School of Music at NCMC has a vision and emphasis of its own. This vision, expressed in the classes offered by our outstanding faculty, takes shape within our major programs. Our vision is nurtured by the exciting surroundings of this city, and is refreshed and inspired by the talents and enthusiasm that our students bring to our campus.

    Nyack students who major in music are given an introduction to classical music and to its wholesome discipline. Where that experience leads upon graduation is entirely up to the student. We encourage excellence in classical music, jazz, and contemporary and traditional Christian music. Undergirding improvisational and creative expression is a strong theoretical and historical background. Of all our students, we urge literacy in every sense of the word, so that they can graduate as well-educated, mature people, prepared to serve wherever they are called. The vision as here presented offers both a platform for ongoing discussion and a common purpose to which we, as Christian musicians and educators, can commonly ascribe.

    Our desire is that the learning techniques mastered within this four-year program will last many of our students throughout their lifetime, so that we may all be life-long learners with the ability to use our practice and study time efficiently and well. If, while preparing future graduates in the best way we know how, we equip our students with the art of learning how to learn, we will have done a great service to them, no matter where their future roads may lead.  

 

 

 

FACULTY

Professors:

Glenn N. Koponen –               Dean, School of Music; Professor of Music Education & Applied Music. Teaches—Trumpet, Orchestration, Orchestral Conducting, Wind Ensemble, Brass Ensemble, 20th Century Music History

Sue Lane Talley –                   Director School of Music NYC Campus. Teaches—Piano, Recorder, Ensembles, Opera accompanying, Music History, Worship Studies, Chamber Singers

Lars Frandsen –                     Music Theory Coordinator. Teaches—Music Theory--Guitar, Music Theory, Music History, Early Music Studies, Ensembles

Joan Mallory –                      Music Education Department Head, Piano, Music Ed courses

Dana Talley –                         Coordinator of Vocal Program. Teaches—Voice, Music History, Opera, Music Education, Language Diction, Music Appreciation

Elizabeth Swanson –               Chorale Director. Teaches—Conducting, Music History, Ear Training and Sight Singing

 

Jhasoa Agosto –                    Voice, Ear Training and Sight Singing, Diction, Composition

Mary Carey –                        Voice, Music Education

Tom Christensen –                Sax, Clarinet, Music Education

Stephen Clapp –                     Violin

Jason Covey –                        Trumpet

Laura Covey –                      Oboe

Sharmi Harper –                   Voice, Ear Training and Sight Singing

Matthew Hough –                 Music Theory, Guitar, Jazz
Kyle Hoyt –                            French Horn, Brass Methods

Chris Hughes –                      Percussion, Jazz, Composition, Music Education

Mark Lau –                            Double Bass

Simon Li –                              Piano, Worship Studies

Willana Mack –                     Voice

Kyle Pfortmiller –                 Opera Workshop, Acting, Voice
Eleazer Rodriguez –              Guitar, Music Appreciation
Debbie Shen –                        Flute
Uli Speth –                             Violin, Viola, Chamber Music, Orchestral Conducting,

Orchestration, String Methods

Jon Werking  –                      Piano, Jazz, Improvisation, Music Technology, Church Music

Meghann Wilhoite –             Organ

Magrit Zimmerman –           Piano, Opera Workshop, Chamber Music, Accompanying

 

(Biographies of all professors can be found at the following website: http://www.nyack.edu/content/MusicNYCFaculty)

 

Autumn Nova, Administrative Assistant

 

MUSIC PROGRAM

 

    The School of Music provides professional training for qualified students in the following degree programs:

Associate of Science in Music

Bachelor of Arts in Music

Bachelor of Music in Composition

Bachelor of Music in Music Education

Bachelor of Music in Performance: Instrumental, Piano, Organ or Voice

Bachelor of Sacred Music

Bachelor of Science in Music and Worship

    All curricula stress sound musicianship, active musical experience, knowledge of theoretical and practical issues in the field of specialization, acquaintance with the professional literature both sacred and secular as well as responsible participation in all phases of instruction.  Graduates will have prepared for careers as performers, ministers of music, organist and choir directors, composers and teachers of music in public and private elementary and secondary schools.  Graduates are also qualified for advanced studies in graduate schools.

 

ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM

    All students, freshman and transfer, are admitted to the music program on the basis of an audition, teacher recommendation and written essay.  If teacher recommendation is not possible before the program is started, it must be obtained from the Nyack private instructor after one semester of applied studies. The audition is generally scheduled following the student’s acceptance by the college.  Prospective music majors may, upon request, audition for the music faculty prior to submitting an application for admission to the college.  Prospective students who reside within a 200-mile radius of the college are requested to audition in person before the music faculty.  Prospective students living outside the 200-mile radius may submit a taped audition (audio or video) for review by the music faculty. 

 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT

    Placement tests in music theory, ear training and sight-singing are given to all new music majors during Freshman Orientation.  Students who display competence in any of these areas may waive one or both semesters of the first year courses. 

AP exam with separate  sub-scores for Music Theory and Aural Skills:

Score of 3-5 on AP Music Theory exam = MUS123 Elementary Music Theory  (3 credits)

Score of 3-5 on AP Aural Skills exam = MUS121 Elem. Ear Training/S.S.  (1 credit)

Note: Students with AP Music Theory credits are still required to take Nyack’s music theory and ear training placement exams.  In some cases, students may be required to take freshman theory or ear training even though they also receive AP credits.  Such AP credits would count as electives.  On the other hand, students with a score of 3-5 on the AP exam, who test very high on Nyack’s placement exams, may receive up to 8 credits in theory and ear training upon the recommendation of the music faculty.  Music Education majors with a strong piano background may also waive the beginning Functional Piano courses by audition.  For more information, contact the Dean of the School of Music. 

 

APPLIED MUSIC REQUIREMENTS FOR MUSIC MAJORS

    All music majors (except students in the B.A. in Music program) are required to satisfy a certain level of performance in addition to the completion of the minimum number of credits in applied music. Occasionally this may require taking additional credits of applied music to achieve the graduation standard. Students enrolled in the Performance, Music Education, and Church Music degree programs are required to fulfill applied major requirements. Applied minor study is recommended and optional.  Composition majors are required to fulfill the second year level in their applied major instrument. Instrumental and Piano Performance majors must also complete the Concerto requirement (MUS 476) as described in the Music Handbook. Performance majors will present a Junior Recital in their third year, 30-40 minutes of music, and a Senior Recital in the fourth year, 60-75 minutes of music. Students enrolled in Music Education and Church Music is required to present a Senior Recital of 30-40 minutes of music in length prior to graduation. 

 

Studio Class

    New for 2011-2012 school year and all past and future catalogs, Studio Class, MUS 159, will be a required co-requisite for applied lessons for all full-time BM, BS, Mus. Ed, and SMB students.  Each student is required to attend 4 sessions each semester unless it is waived by the Director of the School of Music. It is not required in a semester where students that are doing their student teaching.  BA in Music, AS in Music, AA, and students who are not music majors enrolled in applied lessons are encouraged, but not required, to take Studio Class.

 

PRIVATE LESSONS

    Music majors normally register for 60 minute lessons (2 credits) in their major performing area each semester. BA students can register for 30 minute or ½ hour lessons each semester.  BM students must register for 2 credits during the preparation of a junior or senior recital plus one credit for the recital.  The private lesson instructors assign semester grades which reflect the student’s progress and performance. Applied instruction is an integral part of the overall program for each student.  Adequate practice time needs to be scheduled to assure progress in both the major and minor areas. 

The following guidelines are considered to be the minimum:

1 credit per semester 4-6 hours of practice per week

2 credits per semester 8-12 hours of practice per week

It is the responsibility of the student to purchase any and all music scores required by the instructor as soon as they are assigned.  Students are expected to adhere to their scheduled time for private lessons.  Attendance at all private lessons is mandatory and absolutely no unexcused absences or “cuts” are allowed.  The following policies will help in planning for your lessons each semester:   

 

WEEKLY LESSON GUIDELINES

Ø  If students miss lessons for any reason without notifying the teacher 8 hours in advance, the lesson is not made up.  Teachers will assign a zero grade for lesson cuts.

Ø  The student and teacher should establish the method for communicating with each other (e-mail, phone—please obtain the professor’s cell phone number which is also posted) at the first lesson each semester. Students are responsible for responding to their teacher’s communications.

Ø  If students or teachers miss lessons due to illness, required field trips, or professional commitments, it is up to the teacher to schedule makeup lessons. Students must supply documentation for illness (from the doctor) or field trip participation (from the professor).

Ø  Students need to complete 12 lessons per semester or 11 lessons and 1 master class in order to receive credit for private lessons.

Ø  “Left over” make up lessons may be scheduled during final exam week when necessary.

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s)

What happens if a student fails a jury?

An “NC” (no credit) grade will be given.  In order to continue in their applied lessons, the NC jury needs to be retaken and passed by the beginning of the following semester.

 

What is the difference between Functional Piano, Piano Minors and Piano Proficiency?                

 

Functional Piano (MUS 101, 102, 201, 202) classes prepare Mus Ed majors to accompany in the school classroom. Functional Piano also can serve as a preparation for BM and S.M.B. students (non-piano major) needing MUS 477, as well as the Music Education and Sacred Music majors who are not piano or organ majors. Student should be able to pass the exam after four semesters of functional piano. If the student does not pass the exam which should begin in the Junior year then additional semesters of MUS 127 is recommended.

 

Piano Minors study privately and are required to demonstrate piano skills approximately equivalent to the first year level required for piano majors as described in the School of Music Handbook.

Piano Proficiency is the minimum level of piano skill required for all music majors in the professional degree programs (B.M., MUS.ED, S.M.B.) who are not majoring in piano, organ, or harpsichord.  Students may need to study privately or take Functional Piano for a few semesters to achieve the piano proficiency level as described in the School of Music Handbook.

 

Functional Piano and Piano Proficiency

Piano Proficiency in All Degree Programs (MUS 477)

These requirements pertain to students who are satisfying the level of piano proficiency required for the B. M. (majored in vocal performance, instrumental performance, Composition), S.M.B. and Mus. Ed. degrees.  Note: Students having a piano background may take the Piano Proficiency Exam upon request during any semester.

 

Functional Piano (MUS 101, 102, 201, 202) classes prepare Mus Ed majors to accompany in the school classroom. Functional Piano also can serve as a preparation for BM and S.M.B. students (non-piano major) needing MUS 477, as well as the Music Education and Sacred Music majors who are not piano or organ majors. Functional and Basic Piano Faculty will teach toward the requirements for MUS 477.

 

Piano Lessons provide an opportunity for the music student to augment the performance and accompanying requirement of Mus 477.  The School of Music also provides private piano instructions for students in non-keyboard majors to prepare for the supplemental requirement of Mus 477 besides the curriculum of functional piano. These lessons are not required but are strongly recommended for students in order to reach the best results in MUS 477.

 

Requirement for Piano Proficiency (MUS 477)

Students should begin working on this essential knowledge in their Freshman year.

 

Technical Requirements:

Ø  Students are required to perform by memory one octave scales in all keys (major and harmonic minor), hands separately two notes to a beat (minimum = 50), two octaves in all keys, hands separately and together.

Ø  Students are also required to play the chord progression/cadences for tonic-predominant-dominant-tonic exercise in all keys (major and minor). Students are encouraged to play by memory. A sample of required cadences is available upon request.

 

Solo Repertoire:

Choose one piece from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty:

Anthology of Baroque Keyboard Music (ISBN 10: 0882849433)

Anthology of Classical Piano Music (ISBN 10: 0739013661)

Anthology of Romantic Piano Music (ISBN 10: 0739032879)

Anthology of Impressionistic Piano Music (ISBN 10: 073903524X)
Intermediate to Early Advanced Works by 36 Composers. Ed. Maurice Hinson

 

Accompanying Skills:

Voice majors: simple art song accompaniment, a 4-part hymn, various vocal exercises (A sample of the required vocal exercises is available upon request).

Instrumental majors – simple instrumental accompaniment (e. g., Suzuki Level 1 or 2, or a 4-part hymn)

Composition majors – student’s own original accompaniment, a 4-part hymn.

Church Music majors – simple octavo accompaniment and playing vocal parts, a 4-part hymn, and various vocal exercises (A sample of the required vocal exercises is available upon request).

Music Education major- a simple melody or a 4-part hymn, played and transposed up or down from half step to the interval of minor 3rd, and various vocalise exercises (A sample of the notated vocalize exercises is available upon request).

Jury Requirements: Piano Proficiency juries are required to be taken during all spring semesters of piano study until the minimum proficiency level is satisfied.  However, students may request to take Piano Proficiency juries in the fall if they wish to satisfy the requirements.  Sheet music may be used for the jury exam. The music faculty will determine if the student has satisfied the proficiency level requirement in piano on the basis of the jury examination.

 

JURY EXAMS

    Music majors enrolled in a professional music degree program (B.M. MUS.ED, or S.M.B.) are required to satisfy a certain level of performance in addition to the completion of the minimum number of credits in applied music.  In some cases, this will require additional hours of applied music.

 

Music majors (except those in the B.A. program) are required to perform jury exams in their major area at the end of each semester.  B.A. candidates must take a jury once a year.  Juries are normally scheduled at the beginning of the final exam period.  Students will receive an NC (no credit) grade if they do not perform their jury exam.  The NC will automatically change to FX if the jury is not made up within 30 days.  In the cases of illness and dire emergencies, the private lesson teacher may submit a written recommendation and request for a jury postponement to the Music Office. This request should include supportive information from the proper authorities. A make-up jury may then be scheduled in the early part of the following semester.  Students performing a junior or senior recital perform a recital jury four weeks prior to the recital. (For detailed information see Student Handbook.) Any student that receives a NC grade twice in succession will be asked to change their major.

 

Piano and voice juries are to be performed by memory. Music Education majors will perform a jury exam in Functional Piano during finals week of the fall and spring semesters until the proficiency examination is passed.  The purpose of the jury examination is to determine whether the minimal standard required for music educators has been met.  The form is to be typed  and copies brought to the jury exam.  It is the responsibility of the student to have all forms thoroughly prepared for the jury exam, as no incomplete forms will be accepted under any circumstances. Near the end of each semester, Jury forms may be easily processed on the computers located in the school library.  Jury forms may be obtained from the Music Office. The information that follows will serve as a general guide to the levels of competence that are expected in each area of performance.

 

STUDENT ADVISEMENT

    Students majoring in music are assigned an advisor by the Director of the Music Program during the fall semester of the freshman year.  This advisor is usually a full-time faculty member who serves as the academic advisor and will counsel the music student throughout their course of study at Nyack College.  While all changes in registration require the signature of the faculty advisor, it is the primary responsibility of the student to maintain comprehensive files of academic progress and accept full responsibility for completing all degree requirements.

The student’s personal advisement file should include:

Ø  Pre-registration forms.

Ø  Grade reports from each semester at Nyack College.

Ø  Any and all in-house documentation and correspondence affecting course of study.

Ø  Recital programs for all performances by the student

Ø  Projections for course completion at Nyack College leading to graduation.

Ø  All documentation as a transfer student to Nyack College including a copy of the transcript from the former school.

 

REGISTRATION SUGGESTIONS & REGULATIONS

FOR STUDENTS AT THE NYACK COLLEGE SCHOOL OF MUSIC, NEW YORK CITY

    Nyack College is committed to the successful graduation of our students, well prepared for careers in performance, education, and church music. These suggestions and calendar are given to you so that you can take ownership of your education and chart your own success. Learn to plan ahead for your entire career at Nyack College.  Your advisor’s job is to help you down this path, not decide it for you. This is a great deal to read.  It will be discussed with your advisor before registration begins and in MUS 110 Freshman Music Seminar.

 

·         Plan your schedule early and then show it to your advisor.  Try to think of which classes, taken as a whole, will move you towards graduation. You may need to be creative because of unusual schedules or events.  All advisors are there to help you through any unforeseen problems. Please do not come to your appointment with no idea of what you may wish to take.  You do not need to finish your financial aid or erase other holds to meet with your academic advisor.  They also have busy schedules, particularly at the ends of semesters or the week before school begins, should you miss the scheduled registration days.  You lose nothing, even if you are not sure you can return the next semester, if you meet with your advisor.

·         Try to follow the suggested four-year plan. Each catalog has a suggested program for your major. These plans are also included in the School of Music Handbook found online at http://www.ncmcmusic.com/Handbook.htm, along with a wealth of other information. Your advisor also has a copy. All students that are conditional or ESL admits must follow your contracts signed when you were admitted.  You may also need to see two advisors and you might not be allowed to register on line but by your second advisor in the ESL or academic success office and then the Registrar.

·         After you meet with your advisor, you will be enabled to register online after all other holds have been attended to.

·         Music majors are required to make changes, after you register online, to Applied Music and Ensembles, such as Chorale or Opera Workshop, that require you to change credits from 1-2 or 1-0, etc.  In addition, some classes such as Chamber singers, or Small Jazz Ensemble, require an audition and professor’s approval and have been blocked.  These modifications can be made only by Autumn Nova, administrative assistant for the school of Music.  All other changes should be done online or with the registrar on the first floor. Only the registrar can add independent study or “Y” classes when all the appropriate forms are filled out and signed.  Changes to your schedule cannot be made after the add/drop period is over except for a WD which will appear on your transcript.  Be careful when withdrawing from a class that you maintain the required number of credits.  See SAP requirements below.

·         You graduate when you finish the required 120 credits for your degree, not take classes for four years.  In all years prior to 2010-2011, 126 credits were required.  Please see the appropriate catalog in the year you matriculated.  NY State TAP and Federal Pell grants might end after eight semesters. Nyack financial aid may not.  Cumulative totals of student loans are limited by the state depending on your income and type of loan. Please see your financial aid advisor not your academic advisor. Twelve credits is full-time but you must average at least 15 credits a semester to graduate in four years. Music Education requires 140 credit for graduation because of an additional semester spent student teaching.

·         It is important that you look at the calendar that follows when you plan your own individual program.  The classes in the calendar, days, and time, cannot easily be altered if you do not plan ahead.  All faculty have been asked to not offer any Ind. Study contracts, “Y” course, just because a student did not wish to take a class when offered.  If you see a class is offered only in the fall then plan accordingly Many classes require pre-requisites and go in a sequential order. Exceptions are made only for some graduating seniors.

·         Most of our students work.  Do not try to take more than you successfully can with good grades. Plan all outside activities, including any church responsibilities, with your classes in mind.

·         Again, REGISTER EARLY each semester.  Classes that fit with your work and personal schedule may not be available after the first weeks.  Online classes fill up immediately and new sections are not usually added even if you have a need.  If you are a night-only student or have other commitments register early!  Since Juniors and Seniors have less flexibility they are allowed to register first.  All advisors have access to the Student Advisor program and can see if a class if full, as can Autumn Nova, when you do your schedule.

·         A list showing your advisor will be posted at the beginning of the semester. Do not go to any music professor but to your assigned advisor, please. Only your advisor is authorized to approve you class schedule and to activate your online registration.

·         Do not leave all your core classes to the end!  A good rule of thumb is one Core, and one Bible class per semester for BM majors and two Core classes each semester minimum for all BA candidates. Try to finish college writing requirement early. It is suggested that you take ENG 101 and ENG 102 your freshman year.

·         All 2nd semester Juniors, or students who have completed 85 credits, should make sure they have a copy of their official graduation audits that are obtained from the Registrar.  Students should meet with their advisors to plan their last two semesters using this as a guide.  (THE RULE IS, ONCE A STUDENT REACHES 85 CR. TOWARD THEIR DEGREE, THE REGISTRAR WILL WORK ON THEIR GRADUATION AUDIT.  IF YOU HAVE LESS THAN 85CR.  YOU SHOULD NOT EXPECT AN AUDIT.)

 

Finally, and maybe most importantly, is the NEW state SAP requirements.  (SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS) These took effect in the Fall, 2009 semester and must be followed by all students to retain financial aid or be retained as a student.  No longer can the Dean or Director make decisions as to probation or status or appeals as in the past.

 

The registrar will check all student’s schedules to make sure the following state regulations are followed at the beginning of the semester and met at the conclusion of the semester. The registrar will issue a warning that SAP conditions are not met to the students and copy to their advisor before the semester begins.  At the end of the semester a report will be sent to the Provost of anyone not meeting the state requirements will be placed on probation for one semester.  If then, the academic record does not change, the student will be dropped from the college. (It does not matter how well you do as a performer or in certain areas of your schedule.  It is your cumulative record that must be reported to the state by the Provost’s office.)

 

These rules will now be enforced by all NY State colleges not just Nyack College.  The State of New York will deny all financial aid RETROACTIVELY and that is why we must all be so careful. The State requirements are as follows:

 

1.      All full time students must take a minimum of 12 credits that count  towards their degree, NOT any 12 credits. You may take up to 18 credits for no additional tuition, but 12 credits each semester must be classes required by the catalog and appear on the rating sheet. After 18 credits you will need approval of the Director of the School of Music and pay an additional fee.

2.      All students must pass 9 credits per semester to keep their financial aid. This is cumulative. For example, if you fail classes and pass only 6 credits and be put on probation, you will need to then pass 12 credits the next semester to total 18 credits. At the end of each semester you would then need 9, 18, 27, 36, etc. total credits passed.

3.      If you are on probation you are limited to 13 total credits making this very difficult.

4.      If you fail any class there is a new state requirement that you must repeat the class the next semester it is offered. If you repeat it you erase the “F”.

5.      Minimum GPA must be retained in addition to passing 9 credits. You must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 to avoid probation. 

6.      If on probation, you must raise the cumulative GPA to 2.0 that semester.

7.      If you are on probation you will need to sign an Academic Recovery Contract and also agree to meet with a designated professor(s) every week.

8.      If you are a music education major you will need to pass three state certification exams before you can student teach. You will also need to have a minimum cumulative 2.75 GPA, and 3.0 in both Music and Education classes, and cannot receive lower than a C in any Education class, College Writing II, or Music theory, 224. The latter two requirements are for all students including music majors.

9.      In order to graduate you must have a 2.0 cumulative GPA or higher.

10.  To retain any MUSIC grant you must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 and this is also true for most other Nyack College scholarships or grants. (You can retain the Music grant only for the semester you are on probation, and then lose it for all following semesters.) This is a grant probation not an academic probation. If you drop out for a semester you keep your grants.  If it is more than one semester you must either re-apply for Nyack College general grants or scholarships or re-audition for music grants.

 

This is complicated!  Sorry for all the rules, but except for number 10, they are given to us by the board of Regents in Albany not our School of Music or Nyack College and are new to faculty as well!

 

DEGREE OFFERINGS, DEGREE REQUIREMENTS & RECOMMENED REPERTORY:

Please refer to the current catalog for up-to-date infromation regarding specific course details and program sequences.

 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC

    There are many students who wish for a degree in Music who are best able, either for academic or for financial reasons, to complete a two-year program. We wish to be able to include as many students as possible without jeopardizing the progress of advanced students. At the same time, we are eager to offer a solid two-year program with a Music emphasis, which will serve both the College and surrounding community, particularly in service to our church music ministries.

 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC

    The B.A. in Music program affords students the opportunity to study music primarily from a liberal arts perspective.  It provides a strong foundation in music literature and history, theory and ear training, and consistent studies in performance areas, both individual and ensemble.  This program is designed to serve students having solid intellectual interests and a commitment to aesthetic and artistic values.  Students may also pursue significant studies in other liberal arts areas such as English, Psychology, Philosophy, Religion, or History.  Depending upon the secondary areas of concentration, graduates of this program are prepared for careers in music-related fields, such as church music ministries, music business, management, marketing, public relations, recording, radio and television, music theater and communications.  Students may also pursue graduate studies in musicology, music education, and other music-related fields.  120 credit hours are required to the Bachelor of Arts degree.  See catalog.

 

Bachelor of Arts in Music: Major in Voice

    Each student should have three songs memorized each semester. Six songs total are required for the end-of-year jury exam. The B.A. in music candidates are required to take (1 credit) ½ hour lessons each semester but often choose 2 credits or one-hour lessons using the additional credits as music electives. Students also may finish their eight required total credits in fewer than eight semesters and will need to take juries only as long as they are still taking lessons but must take a total of eight credits of voice lessons.

 

As a general rule, the requirements for the four-year course of study and the jury exam are approximately equal to the first two-year repertory requirements as detailed above for vocal performance majors.  Repertory will be assigned appropriate for the age and ability of the singer but will follow an individual program designed by the voice instructor. However, the individual teacher should design the vocal repertory as closely as possible to fit the normal college curriculum as listed above if variations are desired.  Again, all B.A. in music candidates are required to perform in a recital and prepare a jury once a year. Two (2) consecutive failures in their jury examinations will cause the student to be dropped as music major.

 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN COMPOSITION

    This degree program is designed to prepare qualified students for careers in the fields of composition and arranging, as well as graduate study in these fields.  Applied requirements for composition majors include a major area of performance, and each student will present a senior recital (one hour in length) of original compositions organized, conducted, or performed by the student.  Composition majors not majoring in piano will be required to pass a Piano Proficiency exam.  120 credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Music degree.  See catalog.

 

Requirements for Entrance: Prospective students should perform by memory at least two compositions in contrasting styles in addition to scales, arpeggios and sight-reading. Scales & Arpeggios: Major and minor (harmonic) scales up to three sharp and flat keys, four octaves of scales and arpeggios (triads) in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat at a moderate tempo. Solo Repertoire: Choose two pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) J.S. Bach - Sinfonia or a Prelude and Fugue (WTC I); 2) an Allegro movement from an early sonata by Haydn, Mozart, or Beethoven (e.g. Haydn - D Major, Hob. XVI: 37, Mozart - K. 282 or Beethoven - Op. 79; 3) Schubert - Impromptu Op. 142, No. 2; 4.) Khachaturian - Toccata. Sight-Reading: Applicants may be asked to sight-read a simple song or four-part piece.

 

First Year: Four octaves of all major and harmonic minor scales and arpeggios in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat (scales = 50-60, arpeggios = 40-50).  Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty): 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - Sinfonias, Preludes and Fugues (WTC I); two Sonatas by Scarlatti or Soler. 2) Classical: Early Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven (mvts. I/III; mvt. II has to be combined with either I or III). 3) Romantic: Chopin – Mazurkas, Waltzes, Nocturnes; Mendelssohn - Songs Without Words; Brahms – Intermezzi; Schubert –Impromptus; Schumann Op. 1, 2, 12, 15, 18, 19* 21, 23, 28; 82; Liszt - Consolations and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy – Preludes, Children’s Corner, Suite Bergamasque; Bartok – Suite Op. 14, Allegro Barbaro; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Sight-Reading: Hymns and vocal accompaniment.  

 

Second Year: All major and minor (natural, harmonic and melodic) scales one octave apart, and also in thirds, sixths, tenths, and chromatic scales = 80-90. Arpeggios: all major and minor arpeggios in triads, dominant and diminished seventh chords, in root position and inversions = 70-80.  Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: Bach - Preludes and Fugues (WTC II), French Suites. 2) Classical: Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Mendelssohn – Variations Serieuse; Schubert – Impromptus, Sonatas; Schumann Op. 6, 7, 9, 26; Brahms – Variations, Liszt – Liebesträume, Concert Etudes; Hungarian Rhapsodies, and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy –Preludes, Estampes, Images 1905, Suite pour le piano; Ravel – Sonatine; Prokofiev – Visions Fugitives, Sonata No. 3; Rachmaninoff – Preludes; Gershwin – Preludes; Albeniz – España; Ginastera – Danzas Argentinas; Messiaen – Preludes; Webern – Variations Op. 27; Crawford Seeger – Four Preludes; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment.  Requirements for Composition Piano Juries: Memorized scales and arpeggios and two selections of solo repertoire in contrasting styles at the end of each semester. Music may be used for the solo repertoire. No juries required during the semester of senior recital.

Bachelor of Music in Music Education

    The Music Education major is designed for the training of teachers in elementary and secondary school music in accordance with the requirements of the Division of Teacher Education and Certification of the Department of Higher Education of the State of New York.  In New York, permanent certification for teaching in the public schools is open only to those holding a master’s degree and having two years teaching experience; this curriculum, therefore, leads to recommendation for the provisional certificate for teaching (K-12) in the elementary, middle and high schools of New York.  The State of New York certification procedures require that recommended students make personal application for this provisional certificate. The State of New York also requires that periodic testing administered for and that students demonstrate competency by passing these tests—list and reward students will receive individualized programs detailing required examinations and dates of administration. Education students must pass these tests in order to be admitted to upper division classes.

 

Graduates are also qualified to teach music on the mission field in schools for children of missionaries and government officials.  The teacher education program of Nyack College has been approved by the Certification Commission of the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) for the preparation of teachers for ministry in Christian school education.  The focus of this course is the development of well-rounded and effective teachers.  The inclusion of Bible courses makes an ideal program for one who wishes to serve both the community and church interests. In addition to the general admission requirements listed in the Nyack College catalog, applicants will be expected to have satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board (generally 920 or more).  Applicants wishing to transfer into the program in cases where the SAT scores are insufficient or not readily available will be expected to present a grade point average of not less than 2.50 on a four-point scale.  140 credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Music in Music Education degree.  See catalog. 

 

Mus.Ed – Piano Majors

    Requirements for Entrance: Prospective students should perform by memory two compositions in contrasting styles in addition to scales, arpeggios, and sight-reading. Scales & Arpeggios: Major and minor (harmonic) scales up to three sharp and flat keys, four octaves of scales and arpeggios (triads) in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat at a moderate tempo. 

Solo Repertoire: Choose two pieces in contrasting styles from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) J.S. Bach – Two part inventions; 2) Clementi – Sonatina Op. 36; 3) Chopin – Preludes Op. 28 (Any one) 4.)Bartok – Sonatina.  Sight-Reading: Applicants may be asked to sight-read a simple song or four-part piece. 

 

First & Second Years: Four octaves of all major and harmonic minor scales and arpeggios in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat (scales = 60-80, arpeggios = 50-70). Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty): 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - Sinfonias, Preludes and Fugues (WTC I); two Sonatas by Scarlatti or Soler. 2) Classical: Early Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven (mvts. I/III; mvt. II has to be combined with either I or III). 3) Romantic: Chopin – Mazurkas, Waltzes, Nocturnes; Mendelssohn - Songs Without Words; Brahms – Intermezzi; Schubert –Impromptus; Schumann Op. 1, 2, 12, 15, 18, 19* 21, 23, 28; 82; Liszt - Consolations and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy – Preludes, Children’s Corner, Suite Bergamasque; Bartok – Suite Op. 14, Allegro Barbaro; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Sight-Reading: Hymns and vocal accompaniment.  

 

Third Year: All major and minor (natural, harmonic and melodic) scales one octave apart, and also in thirds, sixths, tenths, and chromatic scales = 80-90. Arpeggios: all major and minor arpeggios in triads, dominant and diminished seventh chords, in root position and inversions = 70-80.  Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: Bach - Preludes and Fugues (WTC II), French Suites. 2) Classical: Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Mendelssohn – Variations Serieuse; Schubert – Impromptus, Sonatas; Schumann Op. 6, 7, 9, 26; Brahms – Variations, Liszt – Liebesträume, Concert Etudes; Hungarian Rhapsodies, and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy –Preludes, Estampes, Images 1905, Suite pour le piano; Ravel – Sonatine; Prokofiev – Visions Fugitives, Sonata No. 3; Rachmaninoff – Preludes; Gershwin – Preludes; Albeniz – España; Ginastera – Danzas Argentinas; Messiaen – Preludes; Webern – Variations Op. 27; Crawford Seeger – Four Preludes; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment.  An oratorio chorus piano accompaniment  (e.g. J.S. Bach – Cantatas; Vivaldi – Gloria; Mendelssohn - Elijah; Handel - Messiah, Judas Maccabaeus; Verdi – Requiem; Rutter – Requiem.)  

 

Fourth Year: Continued study of scales and arpeggios at four notes to a beat (scales = 90-100, arpeggios = 80-90) and preparation of senior recital. Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - Preludes and Fugues (WTC with 4/5 vcs.), English Suites, Partitas, Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue, Fantasy and Fugue in a; Italian Concerto. 2) Classical: Sonatas by Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Sonatas by Schubert; Mendelssohn, Schumann and Brahms; and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Etudes by Chopin, Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, Liszt. Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy - L’Isle joyeuse, Ravel – Miroirs, Valse Nobles et Sentimentales; Prokofiev – Sonata No. 3 Op. 28; Scriabin – Sonata No. 2 Op. 19, No. 4 Op. 30; Albeniz –Suite Española; Crumb – Dream Images, and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Jury Repertoire must include an etude and a twentieth century work. Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment.  An oratorio chorus piano accompaniment  (e.g. J.S. Bach – Cantatas; Vivaldi – Gloria; Mendelssohn - Elijah; Handel - Messiah, Judas Maccabaeus; Verdi – Requiem; Rutter – Requiem.).  Requirements for Music Education Piano Juries: Memorized scales and arpeggios and two selections of solo repertoire in contrasting styles at the end of each semester. A movement of a standard piano concerto may replace two solo pieces during the semester of concerto jury.  During the semester of senior recital, the recital jury takes the place of the regular jury. Functional Piano Requirement:  Piano majors must take MUS301, Advanced Functional Piano, and pass the jury exam.

 

Mus.Ed – voCAL mAJOR

    Students enrolled in a four-year course of study in Sacred Music or Music Education, whose major instrument is voice, will audition for the faculty of the School of Music upon matriculation or at the end of semester juries, with the same requirements as the vocal performance major.  The faculty will determine if the candidate’s skills are sufficient to complete the professional major’s requirements.

As in the vocal performance major, students will be assessed for their progress at their jury examination in both fall and spring semesters.  The singer will be required to complete the vocal performance repertory requirements of three years of study in four years.  Each student will learn the five songs required each semester and students who receive two (2) consecutive failures in their jury examinations will be dropped as SMB or Mus.Ed candidates. Both majors require taking a one hour, or 2 credit lesson each semester.  Four semesters of piano class (Mus 104, 101, 102, 201, & 202) or private instruction in piano is recommended for the SMB.  All of the piano classes or four semesters of private piano instruction are required, plus either guitar or Baroque recorder class, for the Mus.Ed vocal major. All professional majors are required to pass the Piano Proficiency Exam to graduate.

 

Senior recital requirements for the Mus.Ed candidate

    Usually students in their fourth year will be required to present their Senior Recital.  Many of the procedures for the vocal performance major’s Junior Recital will be followed with the changes noted below. The same skill level as a vocal performance junior recital is expected from each senior recitalist in the SMB or Mus.Ed programs.

 

 

For both the SMB and Mus.Ed candidate:

Ø  The program must be shared and will consist of 30-40 minutes of new music (about 10-12 songs).

Ø  Three to four compositional periods for the SMB student.

Ø  All four compositional periods for the Mus.Ed student

Ø  Mus.Ed students will present selections in four languages

Ø  SMB students are required to have a minimum of two of the following languages: German, French, and Italian.

Ø  Extensive program notes and translations should be included in the program for all Mus.Ed SMB candidates.

Ø  For both SMB and Mus.Ed, 2-3 songs in groups, by one composer, required.

 

For the Mus.Ed candidate:

Ø  Eight to nine art songs, in three groups, with the same composer, in different styles, languages, and periods. 

Ø  One group of songs must be from the Romantic period.

Ø  Only one opera aria and one oratorio aria or two of either is required. 

Ø  Please limit Broadway selections, sacred classics, or other styles or duets to an approved encore.

 

INSTRUMENTAL PERFORMANCE MAJOR – B.M.

    The experiences in these degree programs are designed to prepare qualified students for graduate study and professional pursuits in these fields.  Organ, Harpsichord or Instrumental majors not majoring in piano will be required to pass a Piano Proficiency exam.  120 credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Music in Performance degree.  See catalog. 

 

Major in Clarinet

    Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  Admission is contingent upon the audition, which is held for each incoming freshman.

 

First Year:  Technical requirements – through study of major and minor scales and arpeggios with different articulations.  Perier - Le Debutant Clarinettiste.  Rose - 3 books.  Clerisse - Promenade.  Gade - Fantasiestucke.  Stamitz - Concerto in E Flat Mozart - Concerto in A.  Weber - Variations.

 

Second Year:  Technical requirements – major and minor scales and arpeggios with increased speed; major and minor scales in thirds; chromatic scales; transposition for A clarinet.  Blancou - Forty Etudes.  Jean-Jean - Books I and II.  Schumann - Fantasiestucke.  Weber - Concerto No. 1.  Williams - Six Studies in English Folk Song.  Brahms - Sonata No. 2 (or comparable works).

 

Third Year:  Technical requirements – review of previous work with increased speed; augmented, diminished, seventh arpeggios; continued transpositions at various intervals.  Cavallini - Thirty Caprices Jean-Jean - Book III. Bitsch - Twelve Etudes of Rhythm Weber - Grand Duo Concertante.  Debussy - Premiere Rhapsodie, Spohr - Concerto No. 1.  Brahms -Sonata No. 1 Saint-Saens - Sonata.

 

Fourth Year:  Technical requirements – review of previous work with increased speed and with more difficult articulation; whole tone scales; continued transpositions at various intervals.  Stark - The Art of Transposition (Rahter, 2 vols.), Orchestral Studies.  Weber - Concerto No. 2.  Hindemith - Sonata.  Copland - Concerto.  Reger -- Sonata in F# (or in B flat).  Stamitz - Concerto for Clarinet and Strings.  Stravinsky - Three Pieces (or comparable works). 

 

Major in Flute

    Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions of contrasting style, scales and arpeggios, and sight reading.   Admission is contingent upon the audition, which is held for each incoming freshman.

 

First Year: Scales and Arpeggios: Two-octave scales and arpeggios in all major keys; three-octave chromatic scale Technical Studies/Etude/Method books: Andersen op. 41; Berbiguier 18 Etudes; Cavally Melodious and Progressive Studies, book I; Clardy Flute Fundamentals; Gariboldi Etudes; Hovey Daily  Exercises for Flute; Moyse 24 and 25 Little Etudes; Soussmann Complete Method for Flute; Vester 100 Classical Studies; Webb and Thorson Building the Tone from the Bottom Up; Wye Practice Books (tone, vol. I) Solo Repertoire: Devienne Concerto in D major; Faure Fantaisie; Gluck Dance of the Blessed Spirits; Handel Sonatas; Telemann Sonatas and Suite in A minor; Quantz Concerto in G major. Duets, Trios, Quartets, Flute Choir: Beethoven; Boismortier; Mozart; Quantz; Telemann; etc.

 

Second Year: Scales and Arpeggios: two-octave scales and arpeggios in all major and minor keys; three-octave chromatic scale. Technical Studies/Etude/Method books: Altes 26 Selected Studies; Andersen op. 33; Cavally Melodious and Progressive Studies, book II; Karg-Elert 30 Caprices; Moyse De La Sonorité, Wye Practice Books. Solo Repertoire: C.P.E. Bach Sonata in A minor for solo flute; J.S. Bach Sonatas in E-flat major, C major, and G minor, Suite in B minor; Chaminade Concertino, Debussy Syrinx;  Doppler Hungarian Fantasy; Handel Sonatas; Honegger Danse de la Chevre; Hummel Sonata in D major; Mozart Concerto in G major; Muczynski Three Preludes for solo flute; Telemann Twelve Fantasias. Duets, Trios, Quartets, Flute Choir: Beethoven Trio; Boismortier; Haydn London Trios; Kuhlau Duets, Trios; Kummer Flute Trio; Loeillet Trio Sonata in E minor; Reicha; Telemann Tafel Musik.

 

Third Year: Scales and Arpeggios: two-octave scales and arpeggios in all major and minor keys with all articulations, double tongue, triple tongue; three-octave chromatic scale, with all articulations, double tongue, triple tongue. Technical Studies/Etude/Method books: Andersen op. 24; Drouet Etudes; Fürstenau 26 Exercises; Hughes op. 75; Karg-Elert 30 Caprices; Piazzola Tango Etudes; Taffanel/Gaubert 17 Daily Exercises. Solo Repertoire: C.P.E. Bach Hamburg Sonata, Concerto in D minor; J.S. Bach Sonatas in A major and E major; Enesco Cantabile et Presto; Griffes Poem; Hindemith 8 Pieces for Solo Flute, Sonata; Hoover Kokopeli for solo flute; Hüe Fantaisie; Karg-Elert Sonata Appassionata for solo flute; Kuhlau Fantaisies for solo flute; La Montaine Sonata for solo flute; Mozart Concerto in D major; Reinecke Undine Sonata. Duets, Trios, Quartets, Flute Choir: Bozza Flute Quartet; Doppler; Ibert Two Interludes; Kuhlau Quartet; Mozart Flute Quartets; Muczynski Duets; Reicha Flute Quartet, Rossini Wind Quartets. Orchestral Excerpts: Major orchestral flute solos (Bach, Bartok, Beethoven, Brahms, Debussy, Dvorak, Hindemith, Mendelssohn, Prokofieff, Ravel, Rossini, Saint-Saëns, Strauss, etc.)

 

Fourth Year: Scales and Arpeggios: two-octave scales and arpeggios in all major and minor key with all articulations, double and triple tongue, three-octave chromatic scales, with all articulations. Technical Studies/Etude/Method books: Casterede Twelve Studies; Jean-Jean Etudes; Karg-Elert 30 Caprices; Paganini  24 Caprices; Reichert Daily Studies; Taffanel/Gaubert 17 Daily Exercises. Solo Repertoire: J.S. Bach Sonatas in E and B minor; Boehm Air Varie de La Molinara; Bozza Image for solo flute; Copland Duo; Feld Introduction, Toccata, and Fugue for solo flute; Hoover Winter Spirits for solo flute; Ibert Concerto; Kuhlau Six Divertissements; Martinu Sonata; Prokofieff Sonata; Reichert Fantaisie Melancolique; Schubert Introduction, Theme and Variations; Taktakishvilli Sonata; Varèse Density 21.5  for solo flute. Duets, Trios, Quartets, Flute Choir: Heiss Trio; Hoover Duets and Trio; Hughes Duets; Kuhlau Duets; Rossini Wind Quartets; advanced flute quartets, flute choir. Orchestral Excerpts: Major orchestral flute solos (Bach, Bartok, Beethoven, Brahms, Debussy, Dvorak, Hindemith, Mendelssohn, Prokofieff, Ravel, Rossini, Saint-Saëns, Strauss, etc.)

 

Major in Classical Guitar

    Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least three contrasting compositions from different style periods, in addition to technical exercises, diatonic scales and sight-reading.  Admission is contingent upon the audition, which is held for each incoming freshman.

 

First Year:  Diatonic scales in three octaves. Pieces and etudes from the classical period by, for example, Fernando Sor, Matteo Carcassi, Mauro Giuliani, Ferdinando Carulli, as well as pieces from the renaissance and the baroque. Use of free and rest strokes.

 

Second Year:  In addition to the works from the first year, works by J.S. Bach, such as the “lute” suites (BWV 995-1006A), the ‘cello suites (BWV 1007-1012), and the solo violin works (BWV 1001-1006), are studied in the second year. Also required are works by contemporary composers, such as, those by Heitor Villa Lobos or Leo Brouwer.

 

Third Year:  In addition to the repertoire from first and second years, a complete work in sonata form, or a theme and variations work is required for the third year. Also required is a work from the Spanish national romantic repertoire, such as those by Isaac Albeniz, Manuel de Falla, Joaquin Turina or Enrique Granados.

 

Fourth Year:  In addition to the works studied in the first three years, a guitar concerto will be required in the fourth year, as will a work by a contemporary composer, such as Alberto Ginastera, Hans Werner Henze, Reginald Smith Brindle or Benjamin Britten.

 

Major in Horn

    Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  Admission is contingent upon the audition, which is held for each incoming freshman.

 

First Year:  Technical requirements: all major and minor scales, study of the transpositions commonly used for horn.  Maxime-Alphonse Method, Book 3; Pottag-Andraud Method, Book 1.  Solo material of the difficulty of Mozart, Concerto No. 2.

 

Second Year:  Continuation of transpositions; orchestra excerpts.  Maxime-Alphonse Method, Book 4; Pottag-Andraud Method, Books 1 and 2.  Solo material of the difficulty of Mozart, Concerti No. 1 and 3.

 

Third Year:  Continuation of orchestral studies; Maxime-Alphonse Method, Book 5; Pottag-Andraud Method, Book 2.  Schumann - Adagio and Allegro; R. Strauss - Concerto No. 1; Hindemith - Concerto for Horn and Sonata for Horn; solos by Stevens and Beversdorf.

 

Fourth Year:  Continuation of orchestral studies.  Maxime-Alphonse Method, Book 6; Reynolds - Forty-two Etudes; Mozart - Concerto No. 4; R. Strauss - Concerto No. 2; Gliere - Concerto; solos by Jacob and Tomasi and other works of comparable difficulty.

 

Major in Baroque Recorder

    Requirements for Entrance: Incoming students who desire to major in Recorder should be able to demonstrate slurred half-scales and arpeggios throughout the range of the instrument, using standard fingering, and should demonstrate good finger technique and posture, the ability to sustain tones without wavering, the ability to match pitches with other players, and the ability to sight-read soprano or alto material in the treble clef.  They should present at least two selections for soprano or alto recorder. They should also demonstrate ability to play upper-intermediate recorder repertoire (2 selections), and have some experienced playing in mixed consort. Mastery of the following technical and repertoire selections, or their equivalents, will lead to the Performance Degree in Baroque Recorder.

 

FIRST YEAR: Soprano: Kallay: Key Exercises for descant recorder (EMB), Dexterity Exercises and Dances for F (or C) Recorders by G. Rooda, Morley: Madrigals for Two Voices; Bach: Arrangements for Soprano or Tenor with guitar accompaniment; Paubon, Pierre: Etudes Melodiques, 2nd Vol. (Leduc) Van Eyck: Der Fluyten Lust-Hof – Doen Daphne, Amarilli. Alto: Monkmeyer: Advanced School of Recorder-Playing (Moeck), Telemann: Sonata in F Major, Handel: Sonata in G minor. Participation in Collegium Musicum or recorder consort required.

 

SECOND YEAR: Soprano: Kallay, Key Exercises for descant recorder (EMB), Heyens/Bowman: Advanced Recorder Technique (I); Der Fluyten Lust-Hof – Books 2, 3;  Tenor: Satie: Gymnopedie, #1, 2, and 3; Alto: Monkmeyer: Advanced School of Recorder-Playing (Moeck), Hans-Martin Linde: Modern Exercises for Treble Recorder (Schott), Bach) Handel: Sonata in F major, Sonata in C major. Ensemble: Orchestral excerpts for Recorder, Wachet Auf (solo from the Cantata, complete. Demonstrated ability to play S, A, T in recorder group or mixed consort, Renaissance or Baroque music. Demonstrated ability to play Baroque trills.

 

THIRD YEAR: Alto: Demonstrated ability to play chromatic scales (Monkmeyer, 79) in pitch. Advanced Scales and Arpeggios in all major and minor keys at 3 speeds, Kees Boeke, The Complete Articulator, Heyens/Bowman, Advanced Recorder Technique, Vol. II (particularly double-tonguing and finger-vibrato), Handel: Sonata in Bb Major, Barsanti: Sonata in F major Bass: Marcello: Sonata 1, for Bass Recorder and Continuo (Arcadian Press) Demonstrated ability to play SATB in recorder or mixed consort and to read Bass clef. The student is to participate in a recorder consort or in Collegium Musicum each semester.

 

FOURTH YEAR: The Charlton Method for the Recorder: A Manual for the Advanced Player, 3rd edition; Kees Boeke, The Complete Articulator, Heyens/Bowman, Advanced Recorder Technique, Vol. II,  Articulations in single and double-tonguing, using different vowels, Demonstrated use of alternate fingerings and finger vibrato. Demonstrated ability to read Soprano, Alto, Tenor and Bass clefs and to play Renaissance music with or without bar-lines. Sopranino: Vivaldi: One movement from the C major Concerto for Flautino; Handel: Bb Major Sonata; Soprano: Sammartini: Concerto in F Major; Van Eyck, English Nightingale; Tenor: One movement from a C major Sonata or Concerto; Alto: Bach: Brandenburg Concerto #2, Barsanti: Sonata in C major Handel: Sonata in D minor, “Furioso”; Bruggen: Studies. Bass: Demonstrated ability to play continuo for Handel Sonata. The student is to play a concerto during the last semester of the senior year.

 

Major in Saxophone

    Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  Admission is contingent upon the audition which is held for each incoming freshman.

 

First Year:  Development of sound, technique, and musical interpretation.  Technique - scales, arpeggios, long tone studies, Klose, Voxman, Ferling, Teal.  Repertory examples: Teal, Solos for the Alto Saxophone; Bach and Handel transcriptions, Lantier, Sicilienne; Bozza, Aria.

 

Second Year:  Continual development of sound, tecnhique, and musical interpretation.  Technique - scales, arpeggios, long tone studies, Ferling, Rascher, Teal.  Repertory examples: Mauk, Medici Masterworks for Alto Saxophone; Platti, Sonata No. 5; Eccles, Sonata; Hindemith, Sonata.

 

Third Year:  Continual development of sound, technique, and musical interpretation.  Technique - scales, arpeggios, long tone studies, Mule, 53 Etudes after Boehm, Terchak, Furstenau Vol. 1, Dufresne, Karg-Elert, Bozza.  Repertory examples: Creston, Sonata; Heiden, Sonata; Glazunov, Concerto.

 

Fourth Year:  Continual development of sound, technique, and musical interpretation.  Technique - scales, arpeggios, long tone studies, Mule, 53 Etudes after Boehm, Terchak, Furstenau Vol. 2.  Repertory examples: Bozza, Improvisation and Caprice; Bonneau, Caprice en Forme de Valse.

 

Major in Trombone

    Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  Admission is contingent upon the audition which is held for each incoming freshman.

 

First Year:  Technical requirements – development of embouchure, breathing, staccato, and legato tonguing; tenor clef reading.  Arban and Cornette methods; Bordogni-Rochut, Melodious Etudes, Vol. 1; Mantia, The Trombone Virtuoso.  Paris Conservatoire solo material by Barat, de la Nux, Busser, Croce-Spinelli, and others of comparable difficulty.

 

Second Year:  Technical requirements – continuation of tenor clef and introduction of alto clef reading.  Continuation of Bordogni-Rochut and manti studies; clef studies by Blazevitch, Stefaniszin; LaFosse, School for Sight-reading, Vol. A-B; Kopprasch, Selected Studies, Vol. 1. Solo material from Solo Book No. 1 (E. Glover), Paris Conservatoire solos by Busser, Pfieffer, and Saint-Saens; Galliard, Six Sonatas; Blazevitch, Concert Piece No. 5; and works of comparable difficulty.  Passages from the orchestral repertoire.

 

Third Year:  Continuation of clef studies; LaFosse, Vol. C-E; Bordogni-Rochut, Melodious Etudes, Vol. II; Kopprasch, Selected Studies Vol. II; Vobaron, 34 Etudes; Aaron Harris, Method, Vol. II; Kreutzer-Schaefer, 10 Etudes.  Solo material from Solo Book No. 2 (E. Glover); solos by Guilmant, Sonatas; Handel-LaFosse, Concerto in F minor; Hindemith, Sonata; and works of comparable difficulty.  Passages from the orchestral repertoire.

 

Fourth Year:  LaFosse, Advanced Method, Vol. II.  Bordogni-Rochut, Melodious Etudes, Vol. III; Blazevitch, Equences.  Etudes by Bitsch, Bozza, Boutry, and Pichaureau.  Bach--LaFosse, Suites for Unaccompanied Violincello; solos by Defay, Berghmans, Salzedo, and Tomasi.  Creton, Fantasy; Bloch, Symphony; Takacs, Sonata; Martin, Ballade; Corello-Gibson, Sonata in D minor; and works of comparable difficulty.  Passages from the orchestral repertoire.

 

Major in Trumpet

    Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  Admission is contingent upon the audition, which is held for each incoming freshman.

 

First Year: Emphasis on fundamental techniques of tone production and articulation.   Studies of Arban, Clarke, Sachse, and Scholossberg.  Solos by Balay, Bozza, Goedicke, Hovhaness, Nelhybel, and Purcell.

 

Second Year:  Emphasis on transposition and solo repertoire.  Studies of Bousquet, Brandt, Sachse, and Bartold.  Solos of Barat, Corelli, Frackenpohl, Haydn, Kennan, Peeters, and Copland.

 

Third Year:  Emphasis on solo and orchestral repertoire.  Use of the C and D trumpets.  Studies of Bartold, Brandt, Charlier, and Harris.  Solos of Bozza, Enesco, Giannini, Hindemith, Hummel, Kaminski, Riisager, and Torelli in preparation of a junior recital.

 

Fourth Year:  Continuation of solo and orchestral repertoire.  Studies of Bartold, Bitsch, Charlier, Petit, and Tomasi.  Solos of Addison, Bitsch, Honegger, Pakmutova, Stevens, and Telemann in preparation of a senior recital.

 

Major in Tuba

Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  Admission is contingent upon the audition which is held for each incoming freshman.

 

First Year:  Technical requirements – development of embouchure, breathing, staccato, and legato tonguing.  All major scales.  Etudes by Fink, Tyrell, Blazevich.  Solos by Bach, Haddad, Holmes, and works of comparable difficulty.

 

Second Year:  Technical requirements – all major and minor scales.  Etudes by Bordogni-Rochut, Kopprasch and Blazhevich.  Solos by Barat, McKay, Hogg, Childs, and works of comparable difficulty.  Passages from the orchestral repertoire.

 

Third Year:  Technical requirements – all major and minor scales.  Etudes by Bordogni-Rochut, Sear, Ostrander.  Solos by Morris, Vivaldi, Ross, Hartly and works of comparable difficulty.  Passages form the orchestral repertoire.

 

Fourth Year:  Technical requirements – All major and minor scales, scales in thirds and fourths.  Etudes by Maenz, Bordogni-Rochut and Kopprasch.  Solos by Stevens, Tomasi, Vaughan Williams, Hindemith and works of comparable difficulty.  Passages from the orchestral repertoire.

 

Major in Violin

    Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  To enter the four-year course in violin, the student should be able to play three octave major and minor scales and arpeggios, at moderate speed.  The student should also have the ability to perform works with the difficulty of the Kreutzer Etudes and concerti by Viotti, Nardini, Vivaldi, and J.S. Bach.  Elementary knowledge of the piano desirable.

 

First Year: Technical requirements – further facility in major and minor scales and arpeggios.  This is a requirement for each of the four years of the undergraduate curriculum.  Studies by Dont, Mazas, and Kreutzer.  Concerti by J.S. Bach, Kreutzer, Nardini, Rode, and Viotti.  Sonatas by Corelli and Handel; works of comparable difficulty.

 

Second Year:  Studies by Fiorillo, Kreutzer, and Rode.  Concerti by de Beriot, Haydn, Mozart, Rode, Spohr, and Viotti.  Sonatas by Leclair, Mozart, and Nardini.  Solo pieces by Beethoven and Kreisler.

 

Third Year: Studies by Campagnoli, Dont, Fiorillo, and Rode.  Concerti by Bruch, Mendelssohn, Mozart, and Spohr.  Sonatas by J.S. Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, and Vivaldi.  Passages from the orchestra repertoire.

 

Fourth Year:  Advanced technical studies by Gavinies, Rovelli, and Wieniawski; preparation of senior recital.  Concerti by Barber, Beethoven, Dvorak, Lalo, Paganini, Saint-Saens, Vieuxtemps, and Wieniawski.  Sonatas by J.S. Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Franck, Faure, and Schubert.  Solo pieces by Bartok, Chausson, Saint-Saens, Sarasate, Vitali, and Wieniawski.  Passages from the orchestral repertoire.

 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE: MAJOR IN PIANO or ORGAN.

    The experiences in these degree programs are designed to prepare qualified students for graduate study and professional pursuits in these fields.  Organ, Harpsichord or Instrumental majors not majoring in piano will be required to pass a Piano Proficiency exam.  120 credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Music in Performance degree.  See catalog. 

 

PIANO PERFORMANCE

    Requirements for Entrance: Prospective students should perform by memory at least two compositions in contrasting styles in addition to scales, arpeggios and sight-reading. Scales & Arpeggios: Major and minor (harmonic) scales up to three sharp and flat keys, four octaves of scales and arpeggios (triads) in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat at a moderate tempo.

Solo Repertoire: Choose two pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) J.S. Bach -  Two or Three-Part Inventions or a Prelude and Fugue (WTC I); 2) an Allegro movement from an early sonata by Haydn, Mozart, or Beethoven (e.g. Haydn - D Major, Hob. XVI: 37, Mozart - K. 282 or Beethoven - Op. 79; 3) Schubert - Impromptu Op. 142, No. 2; 4.) Khachaturian - Toccata.   Sight-Reading: Applicants may be asked to sight-read a simple song or four-part piece.

 

First Year: Four octaves of all major and harmonic minor scales and arpeggios in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat (scales = 70-80, arpeggios = 60-70). 

Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty): 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - Two or Three-part Inventions, Preludes and Fugues (WTC I); two Sonatas by Scarlatti or Soler. 2) Classical: Early Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven (mvts. I/III; mvt. II has to be combined with either I or III). 3) Romantic: Chopin – Mazurkas, Waltzes, Nocturnes; Mendelssohn - Songs Without Words; Brahms – Intermezzi; Schubert –Impromptus; Schumann Op. 1, 2, 12, 15, 18, 19* 21, 23, 28; 82; Liszt - Consolations and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy – Preludes, Children’s Corner, Suite Bergamasque; Bartok – Suite Op. 14, Allegro Barbaro; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Sight-Reading: Hymns and vocal accompaniments.  

 

Second Year:  All major and minor (natural, harmonic and melodic) scales one octave apart, and also in thirds, sixths, tenths, and chromatic scales = 80-90. Arpeggios: all major and minor arpeggios in triads, dominant and diminished seventh chords, in root position and inversions = 70-80.                        

Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: Bach - Preludes and Fugues (WTC II), French Suites. 2) Classical: Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Mendelssohn – Variations Serieuse; Schubert – Impromptus, Sonatas; Schumann Op. 6, 7, 9, 26; Brahms – Variations, Liszt – Liebesträume, Concert Etudes; Hungarian Rhapsodies, and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy –Preludes, Estampes, Images 1905, Suite pour le piano; Ravel – Sonatine; Prokofiev – Visions Fugitives, Sonata No. 3; Rachmaninoff – Preludes; Gershwin – Preludes; Albeniz – España; Ginastera – Danzas Argentinas; Messiaen – Preludes; Webern – Variations Op. 27; Crawford Seeger – Four Preludes; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty.                                 

Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment. 

 

Third Year: Continued study of scales and arpeggios at four notes to a beat (scales = 90-100, arpeggios = 80-90) and preparation of junior recital. Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - Preludes and Fugues (WTC with 4/5 vcs.), English Suites, Partitas, Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue, Fantasy and Fugue in a; Italian Concerto. 2) Classical: Sonatas by Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Sonatas by Schubert; Mendelssohn, Schumann and Brahms; and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Etudes by Chopin, Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, Liszt. Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy - L’Isle joyeuse, Ravel – Miroirs, Valse Nobles et Sentimentales; Prokofiev – Sonata No. 3 Op. 28; Scriabin – Sonata No. 2 Op. 19, No. 4 Op. 30; Albeniz –Suite Española; Crumb – Dream Images, and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Jury Repertoire must include an etude and a twentieth century work. Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment. 

 

Fourth Year: Advanced study of scales and arpeggios at four notes to a beat (scales = 100-120, arpeggios = 90-100) and preparation of senior recital.  Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - large works. 2) Classical: Late Sonatas by Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Sonatas by Chopin, Schumann and Brahms; and other 19th century composition of comparable difficulty. Etudes by Chopin, Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, Liszt, Bartók ,Godowsky & Debussy. Contemporary/20th Century: Ravel –Le Tombeau de Couperin; Jeux d’Eau; Sonatas by Prokofiev; Ginastera, Scriabin, Copland, and Barber; Albeniz – Iberia (any piece); Crumb – Five Piano Pieces, and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Jury Repertoire must include an etude and a twentieth century American work. Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment and other larger chamber music works. Requirements for Piano Performance Juries: Memorized scales and arpeggios and three selections of solo repertoire in contrasting styles from the following list. A movement of a standard piano concerto may replace two solo pieces during the semester of concerto jury. During the semesters of junior and senior recitals, the recital juries take the place of the regular juries.

 

Organ pERFORMANCE

    Requirements for Entrance: Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.

 

First Year: Technical requirements: studies in manual and pedal techniques in Gleason, Johnson, Peeters, and Nilson.  Early works by Froberger, Pachelbel, Dandrieu and Bull. Buxtehude – Praeludia (Praeludium in F Major) and Chorale Preludes. Bach – Eight Little Preludes and Fuges, & Orgelbuchlein. 19th century composers such as Mendelssohn, Brahms -Eleven Chorale Preludes, and Vierne -Twenty-four Pieces.  20th Century American composers such as Rorem, Pinkham and Locklair.  Hymn playing.  Jury requirements: Fall: Bach – Chorale Preludes from Das Orgelbuchlein; One of the Eight Little Preludes and Fuges; prepare a hymn.  Spring: Buxtehude – Praeludia; a contrasting work from a different period; sight read a hymn.

 

Second Year: Technical requirements: continuation of the above.  Early works by Frescobaldi, Sweelinck, Du Mage and Clerambault.  Buxtehude – Praeludia (Prelude, Fugue and Ciacona) or Lubeck – Praeludia.  Bach – Little Fugue in G Minor, Prelude and Fugue in C Minor (BWV 549) or Toccata D Minor (BWV 565), Chorale Preludes from the Great Eighteen.  Franck – Pastorale, Prelude, Fugue and Variation, and Cantabile.  Reger – Thirty Short Chorale Preludes.  Additional 20th Century American Works by Persichetti and Rorem.  Anthem Accompaniment.  Jury requirements:  Fall: Bach – a larger work such as the Little Fugue in G Minor; a contrasting work by an early composer; prepare an anthem accompaniment.  Spring:  Bach – a Prelude and Fugue; a contrasting work from a different period; sight-read an anthem accompaniment.

 

Third Year:  Early works by J. Praetorius, Scheidemann or D’Aquin.  Buxtehude – Praeludia in F# Minor or G Minor.  Bach – Trio Sonatas, Prelude and Fugue in G Major (BWV 541.)  Mendelssohn – Sonatas.  Widor – Symphonies (selected movements.)  Works by Langlais, Messiaen, or Dupre.  A large scale work by a 20th Century American Composer such as William Bolcom or William Albright.  Score reading and Transposition.  Jury requirements: Fall: Buxtehude – Praeludia; a work from the Renaissance or Early Baroque; a 20th century American work; prepare an unaccompanied anthem in open score; prepare a transposition of a hymn.  Spring:  Bach – Prelude and Fugue; a work from the Romantic Period; a 20th century American work; read an unaccompanied anthem in open score, transpose a hymn at sight.

 

Fourth Year: Early works by Schlick, Byrd and Gibbons.  Bruhns – Praeludia.  Bach – Passacaglia (BWV 582), Prelude and Fugue in E-flat Major (BWV 552), Toccata, Adiago and Fugue (BWV 564.)  Vierne – Symphonies (selected movements.)  Tournemire – Movements from L’Orgue Mystique.  Distler – Organ partitas.  A large scale work by a 20th Century American Composer such as Organ Sonata – Vincent Persichetti.  Improvisation.  Jury requirements:  Fall:  Bach – Prelude and Fugue; a work from the Renaissance or early Baroque; a work from the Romantic Period; a 20th century work; prepare a hymn improvisation.  Spring:  The student should be prepared to play their Senior Recital; improvise on a selected hymn.

 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE: MAJOR IN VOICE.

    This degree program is designed to prepare qualified students for professional performance careers, graduate study in voice, and teaching voice privately.  Graduates of this program often become choral directors, soloists in oratorios and operas, and solo recording artists.  Voice majors will be required to pass a Piano Proficiency exam. 120 credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Music in Performance degree.  See catalog.

 

Requirements for Entrance: Entering Bachelor of Arts in Music students, for which voice is their major instrument, may perform a selection or two of their choice commensurate with their background, ability, and interests. To be accepted into the vocal program, the student should be able to sing with a clear sound, on pitch, with good phrasing, musical perception, and with clear diction.  Students should also demonstrate their knowledge of the rudiments of music and good communication skills. 

 

Students auditioning for a professional degree, the Mus.B in Vocal Performance, SMB in Church Music, or Mus.Ed in Music Education, must show exceptional promise and talent, and good musicianship skills. A candidate should prepare five songs contrasting in style and tempo that consist of two songs in English and three additional songs or arias in at least two foreign languages, totaling 15 minutes of music. Students may choose to sing in Italian, German, French, Russian, or Spanish and must include either an opera aria or a selection from a Baroque oratorio or cantata. The student is allowed to re-audition to declare a new major in a jury in a subsequent semester. 

 

Introduction: The following suggested program of study is a guide, as each student will have individual needs.  Repertory will be assigned appropriate for the age and ability of the singer and all repertory must be approved by the teacher.  All vocal students, including the B.A., are required to perform in a recital and take a jury once a year. Vocal performance, Music Education, and Church Music, are required to perform in a recital and participate in juries each semester. All songs learned will be listed on the jury forms. In the first semester of study, the jury might be waived with the permission of the instructor and the director of the vocal program. However, certain repertory goals need to be attained for each year and are required as outlined below for the vocal majors offered at Nyack College. Each student should have five songs memorized each semester for a one-hour lesson (2 cr.) and three songs for a half hour (1 cr.) lesson. If a student does not learn enough repertory, or reach the repertory requirement appropriate to their year of study, they will receive a failing grade for their jury. Students who receive two (2) consecutive failures in their jury examinations will be dropped as vocal majors. Vocal lessons, or class voice (Mus 103) are available to all Nyack College students. If voice is the secondary instrument, or the student is a non-major, requirements are entirely up to the teacher and no jury participation is required unless the student wishes to officially declare a voice as their minor instrument and take a minor jury. 

 

Accompanists: Vocal students should ask the Director of the School of Music to recommend a student tutor/accompanist who may help them learn their music and who may be assigned to accompany the student at lessons. Accompanists, either advanced piano students or designated piano teachers, are paid a fee to accompany Junior and Senior Recitals (see Recital Requirements). An accompanist for a student recital MUST be given the music and an opportunity to rehearse with the student in advance. The selections to be performed must be given to the Administrative Assistant several days in advance of her printing the program.

 

Opera Theater Workshop and Small Ensembles – Students are obligated to participate in two (2) consecutive semesters of Opera Theater Workshop while at Nyack College; however, it is recommended that performance vocal majors take more than is required as music elective to further their studies and performing skills, and participate every semester possible. Participation in a chamber ensemble is not required but also recommended each semester after the freshman year.

 

    Students who wish to pursue a four-year course of study in vocal performance (Bachelor of Music in Voice) will audition for the faculty of the School of Music either upon matriculation or at the end of semester juries. The student will enter the Mus.B course of study when the requisite skill level is attained as determined by the music faculty. Vocal performance students, or students expecting to later be a Mus.B candidate, must take a one hour, or 2 credit voice lesson each semester.  Four semesters of piano class (MUS 104, 101, 102, 201, & 202) or private instruction in piano are also recommended, so that the singer may pass a Piano Proficiency requirement.

 

FIRST YEAR:  Technical requirements – At the end of the first year, students should demonstrate good communication skills, a proper command of legato and breathing, improved ability in diction in English and Italian, consistent sound, blending throughout the registers, and an understanding of the dynamic range of the voice.  Students will learn to spend time learning how to warm up the voice and use required vocal exercises, assigned by the instructor, which help establish good vocal technique. This assigned repertory will assist students in their understanding of vocal technique and performance practice.  Students will keep a journal which will include translations, notes, repertory assigned, and an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet. Repertory requirements: A student will be assigned repertory which is contrasting in  style, dynamics, and tempo.  It is the task of the individual teacher, not the student, to choose the selections for the lessons. All of the selections below should of easy to moderate difficulty, depending on the student’s ability. The vocal instructor may choose from, but is not limited to, the following repertory in the student’s first year: Standard arias from the sacred repertory; At least one 19th century African-American Spiritual; English and Italian Art Songs of the 15th to 18th century; Simple oratorio arias; Folk Songs; Broadway musical numbers (Limit: one or two); A minimum of at least one song from the classical and Romantic periods.

 

SECOND YEAR: Technical requirements – Continue first-year requirements as detailed above. Begin studies in coloratura technique and required use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Students should demonstrate the mastery of Baroque, Classical, and early Romantic period styles and should show skill in English and Italian diction, and should also have some basic understanding of German diction. If the vocal teacher thinks it is appropriate, French could be switched with German as an emphasis for the second year. Repertory requirements: All of the selections below should of moderate to advanced difficulty, depending on the student’s ability. Continue repertory from the first year and add selections from the following categories: Baroque, Classical, or early Romantic period opera arias (with coloratura); More difficult Baroque and/or Classical oratorio arias (with coloratura); Early German Lieder such as Schubert or Schumann; An easy Romantic period opera aria.

 

Vocal performance majors in their third year are required to present their Junior Recital.  In the final semester of a student’s second year, the vocal instructor will assign the repertory for the student’s Junior Recital. It is recommended that students take the full year (summer, fall, and spring semesters) to prepare; however, as individuals’ skill and ability vary, there may be some who are prepared to present their recital the first semester of their third year.  Please see the section on fees, credits, etc. found in “Recital Requirements and Procedures” in the Handbook for further details.

 

THIRD YEAR: Technical requirements – Continue all studies from the first two years. Begin studies in secco and accompanied recitative.   Students should demonstrate an understanding of Baroque, Classical and Romantic compositional styles and should show basic proficiency in English, Italian, French and German diction. Repertory requirements: All of the selections below should of moderate-advanced difficulty, depending on the student’s ability. Continue repertory from the first two years and add selections from each of the following: Bel canto opera aria (with secco and/or accompanied recitative); An aria from a mass or cantata of J. S. Bach or other Baroque composer; An oratorio aria from the works of G. F. Handel, G. Faure, G. Bizet, Brahms, W. A. Mozart, F. Mendelssohn, Beethoven, etc.; Romantic period opera arias; Middle-late German art songs such as J. Brahms or H. Wolf; French art songs such as C. Gounod, G. Fauré, R. Hahn, or H. Duparc; Italian art songs such as the 15 Canzone di camera of V. Bellini; Early 20th-Century works and/or Broadway musical numbers; Optional songs by composers from the Romantic period such as: A. Dvořák, C. Franck, C. Saint-Saëns, G. Bizet, M. Mussorgsky, R. Quilter, P. Tchaikovsky, J. Massenet, A. Sullivan, E. Chausson, M. de Falla, R.Vaughan Williams, S. Rachmaninoff, M. Reger, F. Lehar, O. Respighi, etc… 

Junior Recital Requirements:

Ø  30-40 minutes of new music or 10-12 songs (each participant). The recital must be shared with another student.

Ø  Three compositional periods: Baroque, Classical and Romantic, should be represented.

Ø  Only one composer per language, 2-3 German, 2-3 French, 2-3 Italian, and 2-3 English songs, from each cycle or composer.

Ø  Only 1-2 opera arias or 1-2 oratorio or cantata arias and sacred songs allowed. 

Ø  Please limit Broadway selections or other styles or duets to an approved encore.

 

In the final semester of a student’s third year the vocal instructor will assign the repertory for the student’s Senior Recital, which will be approved by both the Director of the Vocal Program and later confirmed by the recital jury.  Students will not be permitted to present their Senior Recital in the semester immediately following their Junior Recital. 

 

While not a requirement, at the end of the third year, the instructor may assign repertory for graduate school auditions and make preparations for recording an audition CD if that is the student’s desire. A fee will charged for the service to pay the accompanist and the recording engineer. The following list will prepare the student for all of the major music conservatories and public colleges in New York City.  Usually the CD will contain six of selections taken from the following:

 

1. An Italian art song or aria from 18th century or before.

2. Both an art song and opera aria in English (not a translation).

3. An additional aria from an opera

4. An aria from an oratorio.

5. Two German art songs (Lieder).

6. Two French art songs (Mélodie).

7. A 20th or 21st-century art song in any language.

 

FOURTH YEAR: Technical requirements – Preparation for the Senior Recital! Continue technical studies from the three previous three years of study. Participation in Opera Workshop is suggested for both semesters of the in the fourth year.   Students must demonstrate the mastery of Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary styles and should show proficiency in English, Italian, German and French diction.  Repertory requirements – All of the selections below should of an advanced level of difficulty, depending on the student’s ability. Continue all repertory from the first three years and add selections from the following: Contemporary period opera aria; American Song Literature, such as S. Barber, A. Copland, D. Diamond, L. Bernstein, C. Ives or L. Hoiby; Advanced French art songs such as M. Ravel, C. Debussy, E. Satie, or F. Poulenc; Continued study in Middle-late German art songs such as G. Mahler, R. Strauss, A. Schoenberg, A. Berg, or A. Webern. Optional, but recommended: Study of an entire, or partial, song cycle.

 

Senior Recital Requirements:

Ø  60-75 minutes of new music, (17-22 songs). May not be a shared recital.

Ø  All four compositional periods are to be represented

Ø  Italian, French, German, and Italian must be included. Other languages are optional as assigned by the instructor such as a Spanish or Russian group.

Ø  The recital will consist mostly of art songs and be placed in groups of approximately three contrasting songs for each composer.

Ø  There will be a limit of 2-3 opera arias or oratorio selections and 1-2 Broadway arias.

Ø  Extensive program notes and translations are required for the program for all Mus.B candidates.

Ø  An entire or partial song cycle is strongly recommended.

Ø  Duets and ensembles are optional encores.

 

BACHELOR OF SACRED MUSIC.

    The Church Music major is designed to train musicians for leadership positions in the church as ministers of music, organists, and choir directors.  The course of study includes two years of approved fieldwork in church music under supervision of a faculty member designated by the Director of the School of Music. Church Music majors not majoring in piano will be required to pass a Piano Proficiency exam.  120 credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Sacred Music degree.  See catalog.

 

S.M.B. – PIANO MAJORS

Requirements for Entrance: Prospective students should perform by memory two compositions in contrasting styles in addition to scales, arpeggios, and sight-reading. Scales & Arpeggios: Major and minor (harmonic) scales up to three sharp and flat keys, four octaves of scales and arpeggios (triads) in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat at a moderate tempo.  Solo Repertoire: Choose two pieces in contrasting styles from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) J.S. Bach – Two part inventions; 2) Clementi – Sonatina Op. 36; 3) Chopin – Preludes Op. 28 (Any one) 4.)Bartok – Sonatina.  Sight-Reading: Applicants may be asked to sight-read a simple song or four-part piece.

First & Second YearS: Four octaves of all major and harmonic minor scales and arpeggios in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat (scales = 60-80, arpeggios = 50-70).  Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty): 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - Sinfonias, Preludes and Fugues (WTC I); two Sonatas by Scarlatti or Soler. 2) Classical: Early Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven (mvts. I/III; mvt. II has to be combined with either I or III). 3) Romantic: Chopin – Mazurkas, Waltzes, Nocturnes; Mendelssohn - Songs Without Words; Brahms – Intermezzi; Schubert –Impromptus; Schumann Op. 1, 2, 12, 15, 18, 19* 21, 23, 28; 82; Liszt - Consolations and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy – Preludes, Children’s Corner, Suite Bergamasque; Bartok – Suite Op. 14, Allegro Barbaro; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Sight-Reading: Hymns and vocal accompaniment.  

 

Third Year: All major and minor (natural, harmonic and melodic) scales one octave apart, and also in thirds, sixths, tenths, and chromatic scales = 80-90. Arpeggios: all major and minor arpeggios in triads, dominant and diminished seventh chords, in root position and inversions = 70-80.  Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: Bach - Preludes and Fugues (WTC II), French Suites. 2) Classical: Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Mendelssohn – Variations Serieuse; Schubert – Impromptus, Sonatas; Schumann Op. 6, 7, 9, 26; Brahms – Variations, Liszt – Liebesträume, Concert Etudes; Hungarian Rhapsodies, and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy –Preludes, Estampes, Images 1905, Suite pour le piano; Ravel – Sonatine; Prokofiev – Visions Fugitives, Sonata No. 3; Rachmaninoff – Preludes; Gershwin – Preludes; Albeniz – España; Ginastera – Danzas Argentinas; Messiaen – Preludes; Webern – Variations Op. 27; Crawford Seeger – Four Preludes; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment. 

 

Fourth Year: Continued study of scales and arpeggios at four notes to a beat (scales = 90-100, arpeggios = 80-90) and preparation of senior recital. Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - Preludes and Fugues (WTC with 4/5 vcs.), English Suites, Partitas, Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue, Fantasy and Fugue in a; Italian Concerto. 2) Classical: Sonatas by Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Sonatas by Schubert; Mendelssohn, Schumann and Brahms; and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Etudes by Chopin, Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, Liszt. Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy - L’Isle joyeuse, Ravel – Miroirs, Valse Nobles et Sentimentales; Prokofiev – Sonata No. 3 Op. 28; Scriabin – Sonata No. 2 Op. 19, No. 4 Op. 30; Albeniz –Suite Española; Crumb – Dream Images, and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Jury Repertoire must include an etude and a twentieth century work. Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment. Requirements for Church Music Piano Juries: Memorized scales and arpeggios and two selections of solo repertoire in contrasting styles at the end of each semester. A movement of a standard piano concerto may replace two solo pieces during the semester of concerto jury. During the semester of senior recital, the recital jury takes the place of the regular jury. 

 

S.M.B. – voCAL mAJOR

    Students enrolled in a four-year course of study in Sacred Music or Music Education, whose major instrument is voice, will audition for the faculty of the School of Music upon matriculation or at the end of semester juries, with the same requirements as the vocal performance major. The faculty will determine if the candidate’s skills are sufficient to complete the professional major’s requirements.

 

As in the vocal performance major, students will be assessed for their progress at their jury examination in both fall and spring semesters.  The singer will be required to complete the vocal performance repertory requirements of three years of study in four years.  Each student will learn the five songs required each semester and students who receive two (2) consecutive failures in their jury examinations will be dropped as SMB or Mus.Ed candidates. Both majors require taking a one hour, or 2 credit lesson each semester.  Four semesters of piano class (Mus 104, 101, 102, 201, & 202) or private instruction in piano is recommended for the SMB.  All of the piano classes or four semesters of private piano instruction are required, plus either guitar or Baroque recorder class, for the Mus.Ed vocal major. All professional majors are required to pass the Piano Proficiency Exam to graduate.

 

Senior recital requirements for the SMB candidate

     Usually students in their fourth year will be required to present their Senior Recital.  Many of the procedures for the vocal performance major’s Junior Recital will be followed with the changes noted below. The same skill level as a vocal performance junior recital is expected from each senior recitalist in the SMB or Mus.Ed programs.

 

For both the SMB and Mus.Ed candidate:

Ø  The program must be shared and will consist of 30-40 minutes of new music (about 10-12 songs).

Ø  Three to four compositional periods for the SMB student.

Ø  All four compositional periods for the Mus.Ed student

Ø  Mus.Ed students will present selections in four languages

Ø  SMB students are required to have a minimum of two of the following languages: German, French, and Italian.

Ø  Extensive program notes and translations should be included in the program for all Mus.Ed SMB candidates.

Ø  For both SMB and Mus.Ed, 2-3 songs in groups, by one composer, required.

For the SMB candidate:

Ø  A minimum of three languages plus at least one song or aria in Latin

Ø  A minimum of five art songs from the Romantic period

Ø  1-2 arias from a Baroque oratorio or cantata

Ø  A minimum of three classical sacred music selections in any language, one or two of which must be an African-American spiritual of the 19th century.

Ø  No opera aria is required, but an aria or a Broadway selection may be used as an approved encore.

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC AND WORSHIP

    The Music and Worship Major is designed to train musicians for leadership positions in the church and community as music worship leaders, keyboardists and instrumentalists, choir directors, sound and recording engineers, and songwriters. The course of study includes specialized training in contemporary worship music, studio recording, composition, and arranging, as well as Biblical studies which help support and develop the character and spirituality of an effective worship leader. An audition is required, for which the student must prepare two pieces of their choice demonstrating readiness to enter a college degree program.  A 2.5 high school grade point average is required for admission to the program.

 

PERFORMANCE OPPORTUNITIES

TOURING OPPORTUNITIES

    Students have various opportunities, regionally, nationally and internationally, for concert tours and performances during their college experience. The Nyack College Chorale alternates regional and international tours during spring breaks. The Chorale toured Italy spring break of 2009 and in the past eight years have represented Nyack College in Puerto Rico and Korea and in regional tours to other states on the east coast.  The Chorale has presented many concerts in the New York metropolitan area. Students in Chorale are required to purchase the Chorale uniform.

 

MUSIC ENSEMBLES

    Music majors are required to participate in one of the following musical organizations each semester they are enrolled full-time in the program: Chorale, or Percussion Ensemble. However, it is valuable experience for students to participate in more than one organization.  Students may register for an ensemble for either 0 or 1 credit.  Participation in music ensembles provides not only the development of musical skills, but training in working together as an ensemble as well.  With the exception of extreme cases, which are usually health related, attendance at all rehearsals and performances of the ensemble for which the students is registered is required.

 

CONCERT ATTENDANCE

    All full time Music Majors in all degree programs are required to attend a minimum of five on campus and off campus recitals every semester.  These programs are intended to enrich the academic program and may include student and faculty recitals, performances featuring Nyack College ensembles, and two off-campus classical or Jazz performances.  Our location in the New York metropolitan area enables students to attend outstanding performances at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, cathedrals and churches, including the New York Philharmonic, Metropolitan Opera, New York City Opera, resident ballet companies, and solo and chamber music programs.  Students in all music degree programs (B.A., Mus.B, Mus. Ed, and S.M.B.) are required to keep track of the concerts they attend each semester.  The Music Office will supply students with a sign up sheet during each Nyack concert and a program for all off campus events must be given to the Director of the School of Music.

                                                                                  

STUDENT RECITALS

    Recitals are an exciting opportunity for students to demonstrate the talents and abilities God has given them as well as an opportunity for development and growth as a performer.  This valuable experience will give the student the opportunity to learn about stage presence, handling stage pressures, communicating effectively with the audience and becoming more relaxed with the physicality of performing.

 

Students majoring in music (except for the BA in Music majors) are required to perform in at least one Student Recital each semester in their major applied area. BA candidates must perform once a year in a student recital.

 

The School of Music and the private instructors will serve the student in a supportive capacity.  Attention to the details below will assure smooth and orderly preparation, and should go a long way in making the recital experience effective and enjoyable. 

 

RECITAL PREPARATION

Ø  Teachers sign up their students for recitals on the form provided by the Music Office.

Ø  Students may not add or delete selections from the program without the teacher’s approval.

Ø  For students using accompanists, teachers are required to hear them perform with their accompanist before the recital.

Ø  Once the program is submitted, only faculty may make changes or cancellations.

Ø  Vocalists and pianists are required to memorize recital music.  Other performers should consult with their teacher regarding memorization.

Ø  Teachers will coach students concerning stage etiquette. (Please see following.)

STAGE ETIQUETTE/ PERFORMANCE SUGGESTIONS

Ø  The soloist, regardless of gender, always precedes the accompanist when entering the stage.  When exiting the stage, the accompanist always follows the soloist.

Ø  The soloist’s entrance is made with a moderately quick, but graceful walk to a definite spot.

Ø  When a soloist reaches their spot, if greeted by applause, s/he acknowledges the courtesy with a graceful bow.  The soloist then positions him/herself with the proper stance for his/her performance.

Ø  When the audience is quiet and ready to listen, a slight nod is given to the accompanist as a signal to begin.

Ø  During any introductions or interludes, the soloist maintains an attentive attitude at all times.

Ø  The mood of the song is reflected in the general manner of the soloist’s performance.  The performer should try to “look like the music.”

Ø  When singing, the soloist should try not to stare at any one person or spot as well as not glance about in a nervous, restless manner.

Ø  At the end of a selection or performance, the soloist should not bow until applause begins.

Ø  An encore is not sung or played unless the audience applause calls for one.

Ø  Encore selections will be pre-approved by the faculty.

Ø  The performer should be in control, poised, with an air of dignity and sincerity.  If the performer appears ill at ease or nervous, the audience will certainly feel uncomfortable.  The best way to learn good stage deportment is to watch the stage presence of seasoned professional performers.  Modest assurance is the ideal manner, and nothing will give a performer that assurance like intelligent practice and skill.

Ø  All recital attire is to be modest and appropriate to the occasion, as well as subject to the approval of the private instructor.  One change of attire will be permitted during a recital.

 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR RECITALS

    Performance majors must present a Junior Recital in their third year to be comprised of 30-40 minutes of music and a Senior Recital in the fourth year to be comprised of 60-75 minutes of music.  Students enrolled in the Music Education and Church Music programs are required to present a Senior Recital of 30-40 minutes of music prior to graduation.  Composition Majors will present a Senior Recital (one hour in length) of original compositions organized, conducted or performed by the student.

 

The following are important steps in preparing for Junior and Senior Recitals: 

 

1.        Repertory should be selected by the teacher two semesters prior to the recital jury. (Junior or Senior).

  1. Junior and Senior recitals cannot be given in successive semesters.

  2. Recital Date (Set date before the beginning of the semester the recital is given) In consultation with the private instructor, a date will need to be determined which will afford the best possible audience.  This date should be set before the beginning of the semester the recital is taking place to take advantage of the available openings on the college calendar.  It is the responsibility of the student to secure a recital date through the Music Office. 

  3. Reserve 6th Floor Theatre:  Except for organ recitals all official recitals must be given on campus. Aside from reserving the hall for the recital alone, it is highly recommended that the student reserve the hall for one dress rehearsal with the private instructor as well.

  4. Accompanists (Arrange for accompanist 3 months before recital.) Instrumentalists and vocalists requiring accompanists for their recital are personally responsible for making these arrangements. Arrangements for accompanists should be made at least three (3) months in advance of the recital. Use of non-college persons as accompanists, assisting artists, etc., must be approved by the School of Music. The School of Music will assist in arranging for an accompanist when necessary.  A fee of $100 is required to be given to the accompanist for all Junior and Senior recitals. This will include the performance and two rehearsals. NO EXCEPTIONS.

*It is essential to work out a rehearsal schedule with the accompanist and private instructor at least two (2) months prior to the recital.  Since the accompanist will be giving both time and professional expertise, it is important to acknowledge this in some manner.  The student should ask the accompanist what their additional fees are for additional rehearsals.  That is true whether the accompanist is college faculty, a student, or a guest.

  1. House and Technical Assistants (Make arrangements one month before the recital.) Students are responsible for organizing ushers, stage help and other personnel needed for the recital.

The Music Office must be consulted concerning who has been approved to run the sound, recording and lighting equipment. Only those who have been approved may run the equipment, and there may be a small charge for their services. If a video or audio recording of the recital jury and/or performance is desired, it is the student’s responsibility to make and pay for these arrangements.  This feedback will be invaluable for reviewing the performance.  Audiotapes, videotapes and CD recordings may also be included in a professional portfolio.

  1. Receptions (Reserve room and make arrangements one month before the recital.) Students who choose to have a reception on the 6th Floor Theatre following their recital are responsible for coordinating the reception, and assuming the cost of the food and paper-ware. The room must be returned to its proper classroom configuration following the reception.  Garbage must be secured in heavy-duty garbage.

  2. Recital Jury (Must take place four weeks before the recital.) Four weeks prior to the recital date, recitalists will perform a recital jury before the music faculty. A minimum of two full-time faculty and the primary applied teacher should be present. The jury date is to be scheduled the day the recital is scheduled. The purpose of the recital jury is to ensure that the repertoire is fully prepared and meets the curricular standard.  If the student is unprepared for the recital jury, the recital may be postponed to a later date or cancelled at the discretion of the faculty.

Vocalists, keyboardists and guitarists must be prepared to perform the complete recital jury and recital from memory.  For the jury, at least 2/3 of recital material should be memorized.

The recital jury is not a dress rehearsal.  The playing time in the juries will be limited to 20 minutes for junior recitals, and 30 minutes for senior recitals. Students are required to provide the jury with a completed jury form and the first draft of their recital program, which have been reviewed by their private instructor.  The faculty will select the pieces to be performed during the recital jury. 

No additions to the program will be permitted subsequent to the approved recital jury without the permission of the music faculty. 

  1. Programs (First draft presented to faculty at jury; print program two weeks before the recital.) Students are encouraged to create their own recital programs.  The Music Office can assist the student with the proper formatting of a recital program The Music Office can provide the student with the use of the copier and stock paper.   The School of Music must approve all programs and materials before they can be duplicated and distributed.

  2. Publicity (All publicity projects completed three weeks before the recital.) Good attendance at the recital is a direct result of good publicity (e.g., posters, announcements in the Internet, personal invitations, etc.).  This publicity is the responsibility of the student, although the School of Music may be able to assist in some areas.  The copy machine and stock paper are available for use for publicity projects.

  3. GUIDELINES FOR SCHEDULING A JR/SR RECITAL JURY & RECITAL PREPARATION CHECKLIST WILL BE GIVEN TO YOU AT THE BEGINNING OF THE SEMESTER BY THE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT.


 

Nyack College, Manhattan

School of Music

JUNIOR & SENIOR RECITAL Confirmation form:

 

      This form has been created to assist students in planning and preparing for their Junior/Senior recitals. Each section must be reviewed and signed by the student and his/her Major Teacher. As each section is completed the student will submit them to the School of Music administrative assistant to be placed in their student file.

 

PART I – PERSONAL & ACADEMIC INFORMATION:

(Completed at the beginning of Jr. year for Jr. recitals and beginning of Sr. year for Sr. recitals)

 

STUDENT INFORMATION:

Name: ________________________, _________________________   ID #:________________

                Last                                                          First

 

Home Phone: (____) _____ - _____________      Mobile Phone: (____) _____ - _____________

 

 

Address: ______________________________________________________________________

                 Street                                               Apt. #                      City                         State                                        Zip-code

 

DEGREE PROGRAM:

Instrument/Voice-type: ____________________     Major Teacher: _______________________

Academic Advisor: _______________________    

 

[    ]     Vocal Performance     [    ]     Instrumental Performance

[    ]     Piano Performance      [    ]     Church Music

[    ]     Music Education         [    ]     Composition

 

Year in school: ________                  Semester: ________                           GPA: _________

Are you a provisional student?                                                                                 [    ] Yes.  [    ] No.

Are you currently on academic probation?                                                   [    ] Yes.  [    ] No.

Are you currently enrolled in private lessons?                                                          [    ] Yes.  [    ] No.

If you are a senior in your last semester, are you certified for graduation?   [    ] Yes.  [    ] No.

 

Please check the type of recital…                  [    ] Junior Recital                  [    ] Senior Recital

 

 

________________________    ________               ________________________    ________

Student’s signature                      Date                        Major Teacher’s signature          Date

 

________________________    ________

Advisor’s signature                     Date

 

 

PART II – SPACE & TIME CONSIDERATIONS:

(Completed at the beginning of Jr. year for Jr. recitals and beginning of Sr. year for Sr. recitals)

 

Please consult your applied lesson instructor and list at least six (6) dates and times that are suitable for both you and your major teacher:

 

1.________________________________

 

2.________________________________

 

3.________________________________

4.________________________________

 

5.________________________________

 

6.________________________________

 

The administrative office will select a date that does not conflict with other school events and that meets time requirements for graduation. Once a date and time has been approved for your recital you will receive a letter in your school mailbox located in the first floor lounge (in the loft area) stating the date and time selected as well as the date and time of your recital jury. You must complete your recital jury 30 days prior to your recital in order to receive approval to proceed.

 

Where will your recital be given? __________________________________________________

 

If off-campus, where?

 

Address: ______________________________________________________________________

                     Street                                 Apt. #                      City                         State                        Zip-code

 

Will you need any special accommodations (instruments, stands, electronic equipment, etc.)?

 

______________________________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Will there be a reception?                                                                              [    ] Yes.  [    ] No.

 

Who will prepare the promotion and publicity for your recital (any programs or publicity must be submitted two [2] week before the event for approval)? _________________________________

 

 

 

________________________    ________               ________________________    ________

Student’s signature                      Date                        Major Teacher’s signature          Date

 

________________________    ________

Administrative Assistant             Date

 

 

 

 

PART III – REPERTORY:

(Must be submitted to Dr. Dana Talley (Jr. Recital) Dr Sue Talley (Sr. Recital) for review and approval at nine (9) months prior to recital)

 

     Title of Piece     from       Opus #  Name of Composer/Arranger      Dates              Length

1.      _________________________________________________________________________________

2.      _________________________________________________________________________________

3.      _________________________________________________________________________________

4.      _________________________________________________________________________________

5.      _________________________________________________________________________________

6.      _________________________________________________________________________________

7.      _________________________________________________________________________________

8.      _________________________________________________________________________________

9.      _________________________________________________________________________________

10.  _________________________________________________________________________________

11.  _________________________________________________________________________________

12.  _________________________________________________________________________________

13.  _________________________________________________________________________________

14.  _________________________________________________________________________________

15.  _________________________________________________________________________________

16.  _________________________________________________________________________________

17.  _________________________________________________________________________________

18.  _________________________________________________________________________________

19.  _________________________________________________________________________________

20.  _________________________________________________________________________________

21.  _________________________________________________________________________________

22.  _________________________________________________________________________________

23.  _________________________________________________________________________________

24.  _________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

________________________    ________              ________________________    ________

Student’s signature                      Date                        Major Teacher’s signature          Date

 

________________________    ________

Dr. Dana Talley                                      Date

 

 

 

 

PART IV ACCOMPANIST:

(Must be submitted to Dr. Sue Talley for review and approval at six (6) months prior to recital)

 

Have you secured a primary accompanist?                                                   [    ] Yes.  [    ] No.

 

If so, who? ______________________________   

 

Have you paid the accompanying fee ($75 for Jr., $100 for Sr.)?                            [    ] Yes.  [    ] No.

 

In addition to you and your primary accompanist are there any other musician/performers will be involved in your recital?                                                                                   [    ] Yes.  [    ] No.

 

Names & instruments:

____________________________   ______________

 

____________________________   ______________

 

____________________________   ______________

 

____________________________   ______________

 

Regular rehearsal schedule:

(Must begin rehearsals with accompanist three (3) months prior to recital jury and no more than one (1) rehearsal per month)

 

FIRST REHEARSAL:          Date:               Time:               Duration:

__________   __________    _________

 

SECOND REHEARSAL:      Date:               Time:               Duration:

__________   __________    _________

 

THIRD REHEARSAL:         Date:               Time:               Duration:

__________   __________    _________

 

 

 

DRESS REHEARSAL:         Date:               Time:               Duration:

__________   __________    _________

(Major Teacher must be present at the dress rehearsal)

 

 

 

________________________    ________               ________________________    ________

Student’s signature                      Date                        Major Teacher’s signature          Date

 

________________________    ________              ________________________    ________

Accompanist                               Date                        Dr. Sue Talley                             Date

 

 

 

 

SAMPLE PROGRAMS FOR JUNIOR AND SENIOR RECITALS.

(The general format and types of selections are included.  It is understood that programs will also include bios, dedications, translations, and other program notes not included here.)

 

1.      Senior Recital for Music Education, S.M.B., or Junior recital for a performance major:  (These recitals must be shared with a second performer.)

 

Nyack College, School of Music Presents

– Junior Recitals –

Brightnie Elizabeth Marie Jones, Soprano & Carlos Andrés Cuestas, Guitar

Friday, December 14th 2007 – 7:00pm

 

“Quia Respexit”

from Magnificat

J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Brightnie Jones, Soprano & Sue Talley, Piano

 

“Danza Paraguaya”

A.B. Mangoré (1885-1944)

Carlos Cuestas and Luis Antonio Peñalva, Guitar

 

“Allelujah”

from Exultate Jubilate

W.A. Mozart (1756-1791)

Brightnie Jones, Soprano & Sue Talley, Piano

 

“Batti Batti”

from Don Giovanni                        

W.A. Mozart (1756-1791)

Brightnie Jones, Soprano & Colin Fowler, Piano

 

Etude #11

H. Villa-Lobos (1887-1959)

Carlos Cuestas, Guitar

 

 “Chanson Triste”

“Extase”

“Le Galop”

H. Duparc (1848-1933)

Brightnie Jones, Soprano & Colin Fowler, Piano

 

Bajo la Palmera

Isaac Albéniz (1860-1909)

Carlos Cuestas, Guitar

 

Seis por Derecho (Joropo)

Antonio Lauro (1917-1986)

Carlos Cuestas, Guitar

 

“Quando men vo”

from La Bohème

G. Puccini (1858-1924)

Brightnie Jones, Soprano & Sue Talley, Piano

 

 

 

 

– INTERMISSION –

 

Concerto for Guitar and Orchestra

I.  Allegro Preciso

II.  Andantino e Andante

III.  Allegro non troppo

H. Villa-Lobos (1887-1959)

Carlos Cuestas, Solo Guitar & Sue Talley, piano

 

 “What a Curse for a Woman is a Timid Man…Steal Me”

from Old Maid and the Thief

G. Menotti (1911-2007)

Brightnie Jones, Soprano & Colin Fowler, Piano

 

Danza Española

Enrique Granados (1867-1916)

Carlos Cuestas, Guitar

 

Variations on a Theme by Mozart, Op. 9

Fernando Sor (1778-1839)

Carlos Cuestas, Solo Guitar & Sue Talley, piano

 

 “Deep River”

“Motherless Child”

“Every time I feel the Spirit”

Traditional Spirituals Arr. By Sue Talley

Brightnie Jones, Soprano & Sue Talley, Piano

 

 “Summertime”

from Porgy And Bess

G. Gershwin (1898-1937)

Brightnie Jones, Soprano & Colin Fowler, Piano

 

These junior recitals are in partial fulfillment for the of degrees of Bachelor of Music

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.      Performance Senior Recital: (here are three examples [A, B & C])   

 

A.

Nyack College, School of Music Presents

– Senior Recital –

Hong Ik Kim, Violin

Friday, March 5th 2010 – 7:00pm

 

Partita No. 2 in D minor, BWV 1004

Allemanda

Corrente

Sarabanda

Giga

Ciaccona

J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Hongik Kim, Violin

 

Chaconne in g minor for Violin and Piano

T.A.Vitali (1663-1745)

Hongik Kim, Violin

Sanae Miyazaki, Piano

 

Introduction And Rondo Capriccioso, Op. 28

C. Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)

Hongik Kim, Violin

Margrit Zimmermann, Piano

 

Violin Concerto in D minor Op.47 1st. Mov.

J. Sibelius (1865-1957)

Hongik Kim, Violin

Sanae Miyazaki, Piano

 

INTERMISSION

 

Suite in G Minor, Opus 71

Moszkowski (1854-1925)

Sanae Miyazaki, Piano

Maurice Ivan Saraza, Violin

Hongik Kim Kim, Viiolin

 

Trio in d minor Op.49 1st. Mov.
Molto Allegro Agitato

F. Mendelssohn (1809-1847)

Hongik Kim, Violin

Marisol, Cello

Sanae Miyazaki, Piano

 

 

 

B.

Nyack College, School of Music Presents

– Senior Recital –

JINA KWAK

December 15, 2007, 5:00 PM

 

“Pour Le Piano”

1. Prélude

2. Sarabande

3. Toccata

Claude Debussy (1862-1918)

 

Ballade No. 3, Op.47

Scherzo No. 2, Op.31

Fryderyk Chopin (1810-1849)

 

Chromatic Fantasia & Fugue BWV 903

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

 

*INTERMISSION*

 

Three sonatas

Sonata in D minor, Kk 9

Sonata in C major, Kk 461

Sonata in D major, Kk 491

Domenico Scarlatti (1685 – 1757)

 

“Appassionata” Sonata No. 23, Op.57

Ludwig Van Beethoven  (1770-1827)

 

 

 

 

C.

Nyack College, School of Music Presents

– Senior Recital –

Willana Mack

April 14, 2005

 

Alessamdro Scarlatti                      Gia Sole de Gange

(1659-1725)                                                         O Cessate Di Piagarmi

                                                                                Son Tutta duolo

 

Henry Purcell                                           When I am Laid in Earth

(1659-1695)                                                         from Dido and Aeneas

 

Robert Schumann                                  Frauenliebe und leben

(1810-1865)                                                            Seit ich ihn gesehen

    Er. der Herrlichste von allen

    Ich kann's nicht fassen

    Du Ring an meinem Finger

    Helft mir, ihr Schwestern

    Süsser Freund, du blickest

    An meinem Herzen

    Nun hast du mir der ersten Schmerz getan

 

 

Giocchino Rossini                                  Una Voce Poco Fa

(1792-1868)                                                        Dunque io son*

from Il barbiere di Seviglia

 

Intermission

 

Georges Bizet                                            Habaňera

(1838-1875)                                                         from Carmen

 

Henri Duparc                                               Extase

(1848-1933)                                                         Le Manoire de Rosemond

Chanson Triste

 

Wolfgang A. Mozart                           Voi Che Sapete

(1756-1791)                                                        Aprite**

from Le Nozze di Figaro

 

Traditional Spirituals                       Ezekial saw da Wheel

                                                                                Motherless Child

                                                                                Gossip

                                                                                Wade in da Water

 

*with Lawrence Andrews

** with Teneall Santillon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS AND GRANTS

    Scholarship awarding is highly competitive at Nyack College and awarding of these monies is administered using various criteria.  In addition to the grants listed in the Nyack College Catalog, the following scholarships are awarded specifically to outstanding music majors who demonstrate discipline, achievement and high academic standing:

 

Music Achievement Grants - awarded to freshman or first semester transfer music majors on the basis of their entrance audition and participation in the annual ISC competition.  They are renewable for up to 4 years provided a minimum GPA of 2.5 is maintained.

 

MUSIC EDUCATORS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

    (The National Association for Music Education) Nyack College maintains an active student chapter of Music Educators National Conference (MENC), a national organization devoted to the field of Music Education.  Music Education majors are encouraged to join MENC during their freshman year.  Membership includes a valuable subscription to the Music Educators Journal, a monthly periodical.  Nyack’s MENC chapter also sponsors field trips, professional workshops, fund raising activities, concerts and guest lecturers on campus. 

 

MYTHS AND FACTS ABOUT NYACK COLLEGE

By Dr. Sue Lane Talley, Director of Music Program

  1. MythThe teacher will never fail me because it isn’t Christian to fail somebody.

    • Fact: The teacher doesn’t fail students.  Students fail themselves.

  2. MythMy ministry comes first; therefore, I get excused absences when I sing or play at funerals, weddings, street ministry, and choir tours.

    • Fact: While there is some flexibility and understanding given to ministry considerations, these are not considered excused absences as a rule. 

  3. Myth:  I do not have to do the work for days that I am excused, because I couldn’t get the homework.

    • Fact: Whether you are excused or not, you are responsible for every assignment. Get it from the professor or from your friends.  It is important to follow the syllabus.

  4. MythChristian colleges have lower standards and are easier than secular universities.

    • Fact:  Christians should have higher standards, not lower ones.

  5. Myth:  I deserve a high grade because I am paying so much for my education.

    • Fact:  Tuition does not cover the cost of a college education, and anyway, grades that are given because of financial “bribery” are meaningless.  You must earn your grades.

  6.  MythIf I bring a health professional’s excuse, the music instructor must make up my private lesson.

    • Fact:  Instructors are required to make up private lessons only if the student has given 8 hours advance notice for an absence. All make-up lessons without prior notice are at the discretion of the instructor and are not required.

  7. MythIf I leave word on the office phone, my professor will excuse me from a lesson when I am sick.

    • Fact:  Professors do not have access to the office phone.  You must call them at their private numbers and try until you know they have been reached.  Reaching your Applied Music instructor is not the job of another student, another professor, or the Administrative Assistant.

  8. MythIf I can’t take a class at the regular time, I will just take it as a “Y” course.

    • Fact:  It is extremely important that when you plan your classes that you follow the calendar of course offering rotations in this handbook.  The student may take very few “Y” courses per semester, and only if it is impossible to take the course at the regular time, only if he or she needs the course for graduation, and only if their GPA is sufficiently high

  9. MythI can turn my homework in whenever it is done and the professor must accept it.

    • FactHomework is due when the syllabus says it is due.  The professor has every right not to accept late homework

  10. Myth:  If I do not finish a course on time, I will just ask for an extension and finish it late.

    • Fact:  Extensions are given ONLY in the case of a genuine emergency.  Example: A death in the family, which necessitates the student being out of town, could be considered a genuine emergency.  So could a lengthy hospitalization.  Missing a class or two because of an illness does not constitute an “emergency.”

  11. MythIf I am having trouble in class, there is nothing I can do but speak with the professor.

    • Fact:  Your first obligation is to speak with the professor.  If, for some reason, this does not help, your next choice is to drop a note to the Director of the School of Music or make an appointment.  If a class is collectively having difficulty, the Director of the School of Music is obligated to speak with the professor and try to straighten out the matter.  That is true of any of the disciplines.  You are also protected from every kind of harassment that any secular institution protects you from, and you are under the same regulations. If you believe that a professor or student is harassing you for racial, sexual, or other reasons, please do not hesitate to let the Director of the School of Music know so that appropriate investigation can be made and action taken.

  12. MythIf I must be absent from a class so I can do extra studying, it should probably be Chorale or other ensemble, because it doesn’t count much.

    • Fact:  Chorale is the most “visible” of the music classes and therefore is extremely important to the institution.  It is also a required course for every music major.  After three absences, you can fail this course; if they are consecutive, you are automatically dropped (unless there is a medical or personal emergency that is well documented).  You can lose your status as a music major by not coming to Chorale, even if you are taking it for no credit.  Warning: Scholarship students will lose their scholarships if they do not come to Chorale or to Chorale events.  This is the understanding upon which scholarships are granted.

  13. Myth:  I’m paying for my applied music lessons, so it doesn’t matter if I go or not.

    • Fact:  Applied Music lessons are graded just as any other class is.  Music majors should NEVER skip lessons, because they get a zero grade when they do.  Unless you are ill, there is NO obligation on the part of the professor to make them up (see #6).  All BM, SMB, and Mus.Ed majors have a Jury at the end of EACH semester, and B.A, at the end of the second semester.  You must be prepared to play a certain number of pieces from memory.  Music lessons are the “heart” of the major.  Don’t skip them!!

  14. MythUnless I play or sing during a recital, I don’t need to go.

    • Fact:  You are required to attend five recitals, each semester.  You are there to learn and to support others, even if you aren’t performing.  This is what it means to be a good colleague--an essential part of your college experience.

  15. MythAll classes must be offered when I can attend them.

    • Fact:  We make every effort to plan our classes in day/evening rotation.  Rarely (but sometimes), something may come up which you cannot attend, either a music course or another Core course.  You need to prepare for this and make other arrangements--even if you might have to take a class at another college and transfer the credit.  Again, please see the calendar of course rotation and plan your schedule several semesters ahead. Work this out with your advisor.

  16. Myth:  My advisor is responsible for my success and will see that I get all the classes I need.

    • Fact:  YOU are responsible for picking out your classes, and ultimately, for making sure that you get all the classes you need in time to graduate.  Keep track of what you are doing!

  17. MythI should only take classes in which I am pretty sure I can get an “A”.

    • Fact:  You must take Core classes, and the sooner you take some of them (such as College Writing I), the better--you’ll do better in other courses if you get some of these “out of the way,” and you won’t graduate without them, anyway. It is best to follow the 4 year plan as outlined in the catalog. You must take a minimum number of classes each semester that show you are progressing toward graduation or you will lose your financial aid.

  18. Myth:  If I only have a couple of classes left, I may “walk” at graduation (participate in the ceremony).

    • Fact:  You must have completed everything (including appropriate CELT tests or other assessments) if you are to “walk” at graduation, as well as to be awarded the diploma.  The College will not grant you the BA Degree and your diploma until you have finished all of the required coursework. 

  19. Myth:  If I go to college for four years, I will graduate.

    • Fact:  While this is possible, it is very difficult under some conditions.  Music Education people must take an extra semester for student teaching, for example; Conditional students or ESL students may be required to take non-credit classes which extend the time necessary to graduate; student’s work and study schedules may not permit the load necessary (15 credits per semester).  Graduation means completing 120 of the correct credits for the major, or more if more are required. (140 for Music Education)  This is especially difficult if you change majors.  Some majors require the senior thesis (Interdisc) and some, a minimum GPA (Education). All majors require a 2.0 GPA to graduate.  Know your requirements!

  20. Myth:  I can take classes in any order I want to.

    • Fact:  Some classes have prerequisites and MUST be taken in order, whether it is convenient or not. 

  21. Myth:  If I am placed in a higher course, I don’t have to make up the credits for the ones I skipped.

    • Fact:  If you place into a higher division, for example, of Music Theory, or if you are allowed, by placement, to skip any other foundation class, you must make up the credits with other electives, often music electives.  A degree in New York State is almost always 120 or more credits.  However, you can, by taking a CLEP test, receive college credit for knowledge gained, and NOT have to replace the credit, since you get credit for it by passing the test.  This is especially helpful in any of the Core subjects.  If you are fluent in a foreign language and write well in that language, try to CLEP out of it.

  22. MythI may take private lessons from whomever I choose, and if I don’t get along with them, I may change to someone else.

    • Fact:  Assignments are made by the Director of the School of Music in consultation with other faculty, with your needs and your schedule--as well as the professor’s--in mind.  Normally, when you start with one professor, you continue with them throughout your schooling.  However, adjustments can be made if there is sufficient reason.  Classes are filled according to schedule.  Don’t expect a professor who teaches lessons on Monday or Tuesday to come in on a Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday to teach you.

  23. MythMy professor will provide me with my music or duplicate it for me.

    • Fact:  While there is some music available on CD Rom, it is the responsibility of the student to purchase the music.  The duplicating machine on the 6th floor is for faculty only and not to be used by students to duplicate textbooks or music.  There are rather strict guidelines in place about music copyright and the School of Music is obligated by law to live within these regulations.

  24. Myth: If I have a problem, the Administrative Assistant will change my schedule. 

    • Fact:  The Administrative Assistant will NOT change your schedule. Only upon consultation with your advisor, and only according to school policy, can your schedule be changed, which has very strict date requirements.  Please DO NOT change your schedule without your advisor’s knowledge. You have signed an agreement, which states that you WILL NOT do this.

  25. Myth:  My financial aid will continue as long as I am in college.

    • Fact:  The State and Federal financial aid programs are four-year programs.  It is therefore important for you to finish college in a timely manner, if you are depending upon TAP, PELL, and some student loans. 

 

LIBRARY RECOURCES

Nyack College:                                  http://www.nyack.edu/library.php

The Wilson Library has a dedicated Music Room on the 3rd floor

Naxos Listening                                 http://nyack.naxosmusiclibrary.com.ezproxy.nyack.edu/

Grove Music Online                          http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com.ezproxy.nyack.edu

Oxford Reference Online                  http://www.oxfordreference.com.ezproxy.nyack.edu

Piano Street                                       http://lib.pianostreet.com.ezproxy.nyack.edu/

(2,500 piano pieces for free download)

Opera in Video                                  http://opiv.alexanderstreet.com/

(ON CAMPUS ONLY 250 videos of complete operas for online viewing)

DRAM (Music Database)                  http://www.dramonline.org/

(ON CAMPUS ONLY 2,300 CDS for online listening, contemporary music)

Academic Search Premier                 http://web.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nyack.edu

Books in Print                                               http://www.booksinprint.com.ezproxy.nyack.edu/bip/

NYC Public Library:                                    www.nypl.org

SHEET MUSIC

(You can also find almost anything online.)

Julliard  School Bookstore: www.bookstore.julliard.edu

60 Lincoln Center Plaza 212.799.5000

Colony Record & Radio Ctr, Inc. 1619 Broadway 212.265.2050

Carl Fischer Inc.: www.moravianmusic.org/publishers.htm

65 Bleeker Street Fl8 212.777.0900

T.I.S. Music Catalog: www.tismusic.com

J.W. Pepper: jwpepper.com

Barnes & Noble: www.b&n.com

HMV Records: www.hmv.com

J&R Music:  www.jr.com

CD World: www.cdworld.com

Citidex: (guide to all the music stores in NYC) www.citidex.com

 

Free Sheet Music 

www.geocities.com/Area51/Realm/5747/thelinks.html

www.freesheetmusic.net/downloads.html

www.MusicOfYesterday.com

The Messiah Score (the entire score and it can be printed in PDF)

www.ccel.org/h/handel/messiah/htm/TOC.htm

Public Domain Music : www.pdinfo.com/list.htm

Christian Classics Ethereal Library: www.ccel.org

 The Internet Public Library: www.ipl.org

Essentials of Music: www.essentialsofmusic.com

Naxos:  www.naxosusa.com

NY Radio Stations: www.nyradioguide.com/listings.htm

Song Literature Scores  http://www.dlib.indiana.edu/variations/scores/song.html

Online scores from Indiana University Library. However, usually in urtext and rarely include translations.

FREE MUSIC NOW  Free Mp3 downloads, Soundfiles, Audio, Greeting Cards, Sheet Music, Jazz, Classical, Christmas and more...  http://freemusicnow.com/index2.htm?mp3signup

Free Sheet Music Links   http://www.geocities.com/Area51/Realm/5747/thelinks.html

http://www.freesheetmusic.net/downloads.html

Messiah Score  The entire score and it can be printed in PDF format.

http://www.ccel.org/h/handel/messiah/htm/TOC.htm

CDR Media  a cheap source for blank CDR's. http://www.ioproducts.com/ioprod/

Lists of Public Domain Music http://www.pdinfo.com/list.htm

A reference site to help identify public domain songs and public domain music,. royalty free music you can use anywhere and any way you choose . . . performance, sing-along, film, video, advertising, business, or personal use.

Christian Classics Ethereal Library  http://www.ccel.org/

Hymnal Indexes, Bibles, Classic Christian books in electronic format, selected for your edification. There is enough good reading material here to last you a lifetime, if you give each work the time it deserves! All of the books on this server are believed to be in the public domain in the United States unless otherwise specified. Copy them freely for any purpose.

 

NYACK COLLEGE SCHOOL OF MUSIC WEBSITES

NYC School of Music Website:  http://www.nyack.edu/music/nyc

NYC School of Music Academic websites: http://www.ncmcmusic.com/

Nyack College: http://www.nyackcollege.edu/ and http://www.nyack.edu/

Nyack Rockland School of Music: http://www.nyack.edu/mus2010

Many additional links can be found at the following website: http://www.ncmcmusic.com/links.html

 

HERE ARE SOME OF THE BEST UNIVERSITY WEBSITES THAT ALLOW ACCESS.

DUKE UNIVERSITY: //library.duke.edu/about/libraries

Harvard  UNIVERSITY://hcl.harvard.edu/loebmusic/online-ir-intro.html

U. of California: //vos.ucsb.edu/browse.asp?id=2722

U. of Washington: //www.lib.washington.edu/music/index.html

 

PERFORMANCE VENUES

 92nd Street Y: www.92y.org

The Brooklyn Academy of Music: www.bam.org

Brooklyn Center: www.brooklyncenter.com

City Center: www.citycenter.org

Dixon Place: www.dixonplace.org

The Irish Arts Center: www.irishartscenter.org

The Japan Society: www.japansociety.org

La Mama: www.lamama.org

Lincoln Center: www.lincolncenter.org

Miller Theater: www.millertheater.org

NY State Theater: www.nycballet.com

Metropolitan Opera: www.metoperafamily.org

Radio City Music Hall: www.radiocity.com

Symphony Space: www.symphonyspace.org

Town Hall: www.the-townhall-nyc.or

Manhattan School of Music: www.msmnyc.edu

Mannes College The New School for Music: http://www.newschool.edu/mannes/

 

Here are the names of some of our NYC Theater Companies:

 The Acting Company
American Place Theater
Atlantic Theatre Company
Creation Production Company
The Drama Department 
Jean Cocteau Repertory
Judith Shakespeare Company
Manhattan Ensemble Theatre (M.E.T.) 
Manhattan Theatre Club
Mint Theatre Company
New Dramatists
New Georges
New York Shakespeare Festival
New York Theatre Workshop
Pan Asian Repertory
Pearl Theatre
Playwrights Horizons
Richard Foreman's Ontological Theater
Roundabout Theatre
Teatro Repertorio Español
The Wooster Group
Theater for the New City
Theatre for a New Audience
TheatreWorks/USA
Ubu Repertory Theater 
Vineyard Theatre Company 
Wings Theatre 
Theatre Guides
City Search
The Internet Broadway Database
New York Theatre Wire
The New York Theatre Experience
The New York Times: Current Theater
Playbill Online
Village Voice: Theatre Reviews and Articles


Theatre Organizations
Alliance of Resident ("Off Off-Broadway") Theaters Theatre Development Fund
The Nederlander Group
Theatre Communications Group

Theatre Ticket Agencies
Telecharge Broadway Tickets
Ticket Central Off Off-Broadway
TicketMaster 
TicketWeb

 

Sites for the Study of Music

The Aria Database:                          www.aria-database.com

Choralnet:                                         www.choralnet.org

American Choral Directors Assoc: www.acdaonline.org

Music Educatiors Conference:          www.menc.org

MUSICA:                                           www.musicanet.org

ClassicalNet:                                      www.classical.net

The Classical Music Pages:               http://w3.rz-berlin.mpg.de/cmp/

A Concise History of Western Music:  www.wwnorton.com/concise

Tips for singers:                                http://www.vocalsplendor.com/voice.html

 

Sites of Interest for Music History and Musicologists:

http://www.sas.upenn.edu/music/ams/musicology_www.html

Web based Classical Radio station: www.Beethoven.com

Chronology of Christianity               http://www.cwo.com/%7Epentrack/catholic/chron.html

The purpose of this chronology is to assist Christians of any denomination in their search for knowledge and truth regarding the development of the Christian religion.

FreeTranslation                                http://www.freetranslation.com/

Will translate any text in about 6 languages but should be used only as a guide.

QuotationReference                         http://www.quotationreference.com/links.php

Quotes for almost anything!

The Internet Public Library:            http://www.ipl.org/

Exactly what it sounds like.

Crosswalk.com:                                 http://www.crosswalk.com/

 Everything you need for a bible study and many bible links.

Essentials of Music:                           http://www.essentialsofmusic.com/

Whether you're a casual listener or a serious music student, here's the site for basic information about classical music. Created in cooperation with W.W. Norton & Company, it's built around Essential Classics, the series specially designed to introduce you to the best music of every period. All through the site you'll find almost 200 excerpts from Essential Classics.

Naxos.com Classical Music:             http://www.naxosmusiclibrary.com/

Please see the music secretary for your password. Large library of classical music which will stream from the site.  All Nyack students have access to this site from school computers.

Musica Viva The Free Sheet Music: http://www.MusicOfYesterday.com/

OVATION The Arts Network          http://www.ovationtv.com/

Watch it! Much of the videos in our fine arts and music classes come from this one channel.  

Thirteen-WNET - Arts, Drama & Culture Channel 13, PBS in NYC.

http://www.thirteen.org/homepage/subject_arts.php#music

World History                                   http://www.hyperhistory.com/online_n2/History_n2/a.html

Hyperhistory covers the major epochs of world history during the last 3000 years. Over 2000 files.

Dr. Estrella's Incredibly Abridged Dictionary of Composers

http://www.stevenestrella.com/composers/index.html?styletimeline.html

The dictionary contains: basic and accurate biographical information on more than 500 composers, links to books and CDs about composers, links to sheet music, and links to additional information at other web sites.

 

COPYRIGHT LAWS

    The School of Music is totally committed to compliance with United States copyright laws as they concern printed and recorded music.  Faculty, staff and students are expected to understand copyright laws and refrain from illegal photocopying or recording.  Older printed music not having a copyright notice is often in the Public domain and may be freely copied.  Most music of the 20th century is copyrighted and cannot be photocopied or arranged without permission from the publisher.  Contact the Music Office for more information.

 

The handbook above is considered an official representation of additional requirements for all music students on the Nyack New York City campus.  Please refer to the Nyack catalog for your specific year of matriculation for all of the requirements of your degree.  The Nyack College catalog can be found at the following address: http://www.nyack.edu/cs/academic-life and other necessary documents, such as class offerings are found there as well. The 2011-2012 catalog will be posted soon.

·         Description: http://www.nyack.edu/images/icons/PDF.gif 2010-2011 Nyack College Catalog

·         Description: http://www.nyack.edu/images/icons/PDF.gif 2009-2010 Nyack College Catalog

·         Description: http://www.nyack.edu/images/icons/PDF.gif 2011-2012 Academic Calendar

·         Description: http://www.nyack.edu/images/icons/PDF.gif 2010-2011 Academic Calendar

·         Request a Nyack College Transcript

·         Certification/Verification Letters

·         Dean's List

·         Academic Appeal

·         Veterans' Benefits

 Other Important Forms:

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Nyack (Rockland) Course Offerings Fall 2011

655KB

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Nyack (NYC) Course Offerings Fall 2011

2MB

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Fall 2011 Finals Schedule

11KB

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Registration Worksheet (Fall 2011)

21KB

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Address Telephone Change Form

24KB

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Choice of Major Form

36KB

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Change of Registration Form

25KB

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Double Major Form

28KB

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Schedule Change Form (formerly Add/Drop)

11KB

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Incomplete Grade Request

11KB

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Intent to Withdraw Form

21KB

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Learning Contract: Reg Course as Ind Study

20KB

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Learning Contract: Internship INT

25KB

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Learning Contract: Topical Directed Study

12KB

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Modification of Program Form

16KB

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Re-Enrollment Form

14KB

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Transfer of Credit Application

61KB

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Transcript Request Form

100KB

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Request for Certification Letter

26KB

 

 

 

·         Commencement

·         List of All Majors and Programs

·         Online Course Login

·         Online Registration

·         NYACK Libraries

Manhattan Campus Only:

·         Writing Center

·         English as a Second Language (ESL)

·         English Language Institute (ELI)

 

Did you know?: Course syllabi are available on the campus network's I: drive! Click here to access.